The Economic And Economic Gap

Improved Essays
The economic and cultural divide between developed and developing countries has been apparent throughout history, so the existence of this ever growing “gap” is no secret to any global citizen. Although this gap has been evident for decades, we must ask ourselves how has this gap continued to grow as the world advances. How can one measure the size of this gap if it is not actually visible? By comparing the economic statues of multiple developed and developing countries along with their levels of gender equality that obviously contributes to the economic gap. These factors can be used to assess the gap that has grown and continues to grow between the developed and developing worlds.
A developed country is defined as a country that is more
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The world bank defines moderate poverty as living on less than $2.00 USD per day while extreme poverty is defined as living on less than $1.25 USD per day per day. It has been estimated that in 2008, 1.5 million households in America lived on less than 2.00 USD a day qualifying these families or individuals for moderate poverty. While it seems almost impossible for 1.5 million people to live on less than $2.00 USD a day these 1.5 Americans only represent .5% of the 300 million Americans overall. You then have to compare these 1.5 million people to the 14.3 million Zambians living in Zambia, Africa below the $2.00 USD per day. These 14.3 million Zambian people make up 98.1% of their 14.5 million citizens. This is a prime example showing the large differences between the economic opportunities that are available in developed countries versus those in developing countries. Another is the fact that the average GDP per capita …show more content…
It has been said that “irrespective of ideology, culture, and religion, people care about inequality,” this has been proven to be true by the hundreds of gender equality groups and movements that have become more apparent around the globe. There is a positive correlation between levels of equality in a country and levels of development. A perfect example of this correlation would be the equality and developmental levels in Yemen. Most recent data collected by ____ shows that only 49% of Yemeni women are literate compared to the 82% of Yemeni men, 0% of Yemeni women in parliament, and there is a 27% income gap between men and women 's wages in similar jobs. These are the main factors that have contributed to Yemen being ranked as the worst country for overall gender equality out of 142 countries. Yemen’s development levels are also poor, economically their GDP per capita is at $2,500 USD. This may seem coincidental until it is compared to the country that was ranked best for overall gender equality, Iceland. Iceland has bridged the gender gap issues in their country by more than 80%. In 2003, 99% of their women were literate compared to 99% of men, 41.4% women in parliament, and a 19.9% income gap when dealing with similar jobs. Iceland also has high levels of development, their GDP per capita is at $40,700 USD. These facts are a direct example of the

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