The Chinese Cultural Revolution

Great Essays
The 20th century was one of the tragic periods of Chinese history which encountered numerous extreme events which developed into the source of discontent in China. The Great Leap Forward, was one of the considerably the significant turning point where the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) failed to demonstrate credential for authority to make “China great again”. This involved deaths of many civilians, downfall economy which lead to enormous tension in China. The flop of CCP leader, Mao Zedong, leading the Great Leap Forward put his credentials as the CCP leader into question. The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (the Cultural Revolution) took into action to regain Mao’s credentials as leader, bringing back the Chinese revolutionary spirit …show more content…
The revolution was set into motion by Mao Zedong, Chairman of CCP, with an intended purpose to perceive true communist ideology in the country purging remnants of capitalist and traditional elements of Chinese society and re-impose now is some thoughts as the dominant ideology of the party. The revolution marked the return of Mao Zedong the position of power after greatly Ford. The moving paralyze Chinese politically and negatively affected the country’s economy and society to significant degree and was known as one of the devastating historical events in the Chinese history. The Cultural Revolution was one of largest historical disaster led by Mao, leaving social tension, down falling economy, and it influenced China made significant change socio-culturally. This social norm caused the authority of Mao Zedong to deteriorate, and caused the citizens to question the Chinese Communist Party’s legitimacy. In response to his falling influence, Mao led the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution targeting the youth as their central target. The Young generation during the period of the great leap forward we’re not given the significant position in social importance. The young people new under the old structure did not have any significance in society which kept them in a vulnerable position socially. Mao targeted the young students as his focus, as their values were being …show more content…
However, the promotion of revolutionary spirits we’re also presented through the form of arts. Mao Zedong devoted the cultural revolution to revive revolutionary spirits to push for the Chinese Revolution. The revolutionary spirits that was the value proposition of the March to Yan’an. The film “Morning Sun” provided an insight on how revolutionary spirits were promoted to the form of arts. The musical The East is Red was one of the examples brought up in the film. The East is Red the Chinese musical that dramatize history of Chinese revolution and the leadership of Mao. Throughout the musical, the music call focused on depicting the history of CPC beautifying the efforts of the Revolutionary Army. This musical provided an explanation to the importance of revolution, and, as the film asserts, represented the new proletarian art. The spread of culture, hence the Spread of cultural evolution first take the form of arts. Educational levels were significantly low in this period of time, which meant that propagation through printed communication tools we’re not an effective mean of spreading the revolutionary spirit. Therefore, Mao used arts at the tool to propagate his steps towards the Cultural Revolution. The East is Red became the first form of arts to embrace this action. Beautification of the Revolutionary Army, the Red Guards, where essential to pull off

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