The Early Years Foundation Stage Framework Analysis

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The term curriculum is defined in the Oxford dictionary as ‘the subjects comprising a course of study in a school’ (Oxford university press, 2016). This definition is extended further by the great schools partnership as; lessons and academic skills taught in a setting, it outlines the learning standards or objectives that practitioners are expected to help children achieve (Great schools partnership, 2015). There are numerous curriculums in the world, some of which are statutory frameworks which outline learning outcomes and objectives. Some are approaches which inform and inspire practitioners on how to promote children’s development. In this essay I will be comparing and contrasting The Early Years Foundation Stage Framework (EYFS) and The …show more content…
One of the EYFS principles is ‘parents as partners’- which expresses the necessity of parent partnerships in order to support parents and children (Department for Education, 2014). Desforges and Abouchar (2003) identified that parental involvement has a positive impact on children’s development (Parker-Rees et al, 2010). The EYFS promotes this theory by sharing progress, information and concerns with parents. This corresponds with the Effective provision of pre-school Education (EPPE) as settings share educational objectives during parent workshops and parents evenings (Brodie, 2014). Parent partnerships are particularly essential for children with Special Educational Needs, as outlined by The Special Educational Needs and Disability code of practice (SEND) (2014). The EYFS curriculum and settings follow this practice, ensuring parents are involved in decision making (Department for Education, …show more content…
These curriculums state that, practitioners must provide opportunities for children to make their own decisions and to establish their own ideas- which represents Piaget’s (1896) theory as it allows children to be in control of their own learning (Hammersley-Fletcher et al, 2006). This is portrayed through free- flow play. Sylva (1997) and Bruce (1947) identified that free flow promotes heuristic play as children explore, manipulate, discover and practise- resulting in the progression of children’s cognitive development (Bruce, 2001). Sylva (1997) and Bruner (1915) both believed that free flow play enabled children to problem solve- a skill which children required in daily life (May et al, 2006). Bruce (1947) valued free flow as a crucial aspect of learning, on the condition that practitioners provide an enabling environment (Bruce,

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