The Early Travel Journey In The 16th Century

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The early travel tales were different in style and form from previous ones. But towards the close of the 16th century a formal pattern emerged that afterwards laid the foundations for the novel. Firstly, most of the travel stories kicked off by justifying the reason for the expedition. Either the first or the third person was used. The relationships and chronological events of the journey were noted. There were geographical as well as ethnic descriptions. Through this the readers of the English world were introduced to the geography of a new world. For this illustrations and maps were inserted. In the last years of the 16th century another important train began to be noticed. It was the Grand Tour . Some aristocrats went to the Continent and …show more content…
This word ‘tour’ also laid stress on repetition of a ritual that was collective. The idea of enjoying an experience, that was collective, made modern travellers inherit the legacy of medieval pilgrims. Like the ones of today, they traced a route that had been developed by the previous travellers. The final point of arrival was generally classical Rome; to the tourists this was their Jerusalem. The observations of these grand tourists became included in collective discourses that debated about tradition and new innovations. So they gleaned judgments and information on the locals from previous travel writings and updated these whenever necessary keeping it in tune with changed circumstances. Without doubt Of Travel by Francis Bacon and Journal de Voyage en Italie (1580-81) by Michel de Montaigne were best in the field of recording cultural findings. Bacon in particular pointed out a noticeable link between pedagogy and pleasure as purposes for those travelling across the continent. Later John Locke and his influential writings on travel stole the …show more content…
This century became the golden age of grand tours. It included both cosmopolitan and rationalistic spirit that belongs to Augustan Age. Richard Lassel called out for screening the present through the eyes of classical past. This became the motto of Augustan travellers. Joseph Addison’s Remarks on Several Parts of Italy (1705) became central to other travel tales of this century. Addison can be said to be the first guide of modern times. His descriptions about Italy were continually linked to history. These were done objectively and in a detached manner. His quotes and interpretations of classics showed how the new bourgeois of Britain had to search for roots to establish their identity. The British began to claim to be the original heirs of ancient Rome (the great Roman Empire). Addison’s method of seeing the present through the eyes of history set up a innovative way of viewing Italy. In his work Brilli has pointed out that it was a kind of “leveling gaze” of these grand tourists who were privileged to come again and again to these foreign lands. They focused on the familiar and on what was nice. Travel literature had become vast and this influenced them. They saw Italy as a mythical marvellous land. They overlooked politics placing it within the sphere of their own aesthetics and culture. This representation of the Italians made them appear as stereotypes.

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