The Dred Scott Decision: A Man Who Decided To Fight For His Freedom

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On March 1857 a case was opened in the U.S. Supreme Court about a man who decided to fight for his freedom. The Dred Scott Decision was named after the courageous man, Dred Scott, who valiantly defied the order of slavery to obtain what every white man had, freedom. Dred decided to fight for his freedom when his master passed away while being at the state of Illinois that was considered a free state for all. Even though the Supreme Court disagreed with him, and got involved in his case to prove that Dred couldn’t claim his freedom or U.S. citizenship. During the Dred Scott decision the U.S. Supreme court was justified that slaves could not claim U.S. citizenship, however Chief Justice Roger B supported Dred Scott. The U.S. Supreme …show more content…
The court decided not only to not give him his freedom but “all people of African ancestry” (PBS) was part of their decision of banning freedom even if they would have an opportunity to earn it. Many slaves at this point found themselves affected because of Dred 's case and the decision that was made by the Supreme Court. The Dred Scott Decision was a complicated case that went through so many process and to the end was not won. The case instead affected the slavery system and that would not be changed because the Supreme Court had the right to do decisions such like this. The slavery system complicated his chances of winning the case and supporting himself of obtaining citizenship. Dred Scott though never gave up to obtain a freedom that he was seeking for and realistically knew it was not an easy challenge to overcome. The decision made by the case caused so many chaos and tension because it was a case that threatened the union. The decision “inflamed regional tension” (Dred Scott Decision) because if Dred was to win his case other slaves would join and file a case as well. The tension created among slaves was nevertheless for either good or the bad. This case deep down was a hope in some way to others that were also part of the slavery

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