The Documentary AIDS In Africa

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HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the virus responsible for causing AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). The virus leaves the human immune system weak and renders infected individuals vulnerable to other illnesses. HIV has been thought to have originated on the African continent and is becoming an increasing medical issue there. The documentary AIDS in Africa details the rise and impact of the rate of HIV infection and AIDS throughout the African continent. In the documentary, various medical professionals are interviewed for their perspective, and all express concern over the rising rates of infection and lack of resources for prevention in Africa. In addition to these doctors, inhabitants of the continent are also interviewed; these …show more content…
This trope is based on the representation of Africa as a land of primitive people and ways of life (Myers 523). In AIDS in Africa, there is a scene at the beginning that has no significance to the topic of AIDS. In it, drums beat, and rhythmic music plays loudly. People dance to the drums in a tribal fashion. This scene plays off of the image of Africa as a primitive and tribal place, and it is included solely for this reason as it holds not significance for the topic of AIDS. The emphasis on tribalism is seen again later the documentary as well. The film focuses on rural areas and shows how some groups in Central Africa have little to no contact with the outside world. The members of these groups adhere to strict traditions and wear more primitive clothing than other individuals pictured in the film. Because the majority of the documentary emphasizes these areas away from cities, the audience views Africa as a primitive and potentially uncivilized place. Although the documentary portrays Africa in this way, it also provides a starch contrast. The film spends some time discussing the rise of cities in Africa because these areas are heavily linked to the spread of HIV. These cities are modern and experience Western influence. Together with the indigenous groups, cities create a polarity in representation; the two extremes of …show more content…
AIDS in Africa does not ignore exceptions to these tropes and even highlights them at various points throughout the film despite the fact that the exceptions do not fit with the film’s generalizations. In doing this, the documentary establishes that these tropes are not universal truths and should not be treated as such. This could be evidence that the views of Africa are changing and are no longer reliant on overgeneralized and stereotypical beliefs. It is necessary to continue this development and strive for portrayals of Africa that are as accurate and unbiased as possible by challenging tropes and

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