The Divine Law In Sophocles Antigone

1796 Words 8 Pages
The constant question of; Is there a higher power? If there is a higher power is it more powerful than man? Questions that have been left unanswered for centuries and that continue on into today. When looking at Sophocles’ Antigone, there are multiple ideas on the notions of law, law of man and law of the divine. Though there are opinions as to which of the two is the most powerful, the text supports the divine law as being the most influential law in the characters’ lives. Consequences the character’s face when disobeying the divines will and the faith they have in divine law all make clear that divine law is the supreme form of law in this text. Divine law is what many of the citizen’s feel is the most significant law, the law they feel …show more content…
Divine law is eternal and can last forever, without changing. This law can be passed down and practiced through generations, while keeping a consistent rule. Creon is currently facing this issue and is ruling so harshly in order to prove his capability as king. Also, the divine law follows fate and destiny rather than the possibility of being controlled by man. Having a higher power to believe in brings hope and often can help people find purpose and brings people happiness. Divine law is also equal and fair to everyone and gives the opportunity for everyone to have the same laws and have the same opportunities. This could be why the citizens of Thebes were willing to side with divine power over their very own king. Antigone, the sister to Polyneices, explains to Creon, her reasons for disobeying him, “…prescriptions of the gods, for those aren’t something recently made, but live forever, and no one knows when they first appeared.” (Sophocles Ln.465-466). The law of the god is something that never changes and has no beginning it has just simply, always been there. The Divine law’s strengths do outnumber the drawbacks and are much more influential than the strengths of the law of …show more content…
Although he does cause most of the problems, he does have good intentions in mind, “Am I wrong to protect my own empire?” (Sophocles Ln. 756). Despite the fact that he is brash with his decision, and does not follow the popular belief, he does truly believe he is doing the best for his empire. Along with the perception of the characters, a reader’s own beliefs take a large toll on how one might interpret the issues arising. A more spiritual person who easily has blind faith is more likely to side with Antigone, who goes to large lengths to follow the gods will. On the other hand, one who is more pragmatic and political may side with Creon and sympathize with his situation. The personal views a reader has can affect how Creon comes off, as a political leader, or as the antagonist purposely trying to upset the

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