The Distrust Between Sexes By Karen Horney

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"Unpleasant experiences with the opposite sex seem to be unavoidable." This is one of Karen Horney 's first statements when she speaks directly about sexual matters and what she sees as male anxieties. She describes the distinct conflict areas between men and women and how it is from psychologically originated in her piece called The Distrust Between Sexes. Karen Horney was a psychiatrist whose career was developed independently when influenced by Sigmund Freud according to a biography published in American Decades by Judith S. Baughman. The research Horney spent most of her time was centered on the question of female psychology. Her studies from cultural studies supported her work on the argument of neuroses, which consisted of sexual …show more content…
An article written by Joe Humphrey 's entitled Has Women 's Thoughts Been Undervalued? addresses this issue when stating, "One problem with ascribing innate, and therefore unalterable, differences to women lies in the creation of self- fulfilling, negative stereotypes." Horney starts by providing an example of how women are emotionally damaged, but not in the way most men think of like constant crying over a broken nail. In fact, the origin of their emotion is one of seriousness. Horney describes a situation of a woman who was "badly hurt through some great disappointment by her father". This girl will have troubles connecting with her partner because she fears every male will suspect that she wants something from them. More often than not, "the repression of aggression against the male drains all her vital energy" which causes many issues in a relationship. As for men, those who have a positive relationship with a woman, such as their mother, secretly do not trust them Horney argues. In paragraph thirteen of her work, Karen Horney described how men fear only the sexually attractive woman because he is afraid he has to be kept in bondage with her. Horney uses her cultural studies when making the observation about the Watawela men from East Africa who do not teach the women how to start a fire, keeping the women from …show more content…
Men are seen as strong, tough and tall while women are delicate and weak. Horney understands that as a society, we rely on a man’s physicality. She states, "He [men] has created values of which he might be proud. State, region, art, and science are essentially his creations, and our entire culture bears the masculine imprint." Men have a tendency to devalue female actions such as pregnancy and childbirth and over emphasize male geniality. When doing so, they are acting on distrustful defensive mauves. Horney follows this argument with, "Emphasis on irresponsible sexual indulgence, and devaluation of women to an object of purely physical needs, are further consequences of this masculine attitude." Also from her cultural studies, Karen Horney addresses the fact that the Miti in Bengal do not allow their women to eat tiger 's flesh in fear of the women becoming too strong. A study of 715 Turkish high school students and 1,125 college students was performed to prove the physical differences between men and women. After their study was complete, Emine Caglar reflected on the results, in an article titled Similarities and Differences in Physical Self-concept of Males and Females During Late Adolescence and Early Childhood, "Ssignificant sex and age differences on multiple dimensions of physical self, and that males and high school students scored higher on almost all subscales of

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