Essay on The Displaced Person By Flannery O ' Connor

980 Words Jul 11th, 2016 4 Pages
During World War II, many Europeans were “displaced” and even in America, the land of the free, they were not treated fairly. They were often treated no better than the African-Americans, and in those time racism against them in the South was still vast. The stylistic techniques used by Flannery O’Connor in her short story, “The Displaced Person,” allows her to relay her purpose of writing to the audience. She uses symbolism, foreshadow, and irony to communicate her opinions about racism to the audience. Flannery O’Connor grew up in a small town in Georgia, and received her M.F.A. degree at the University of Iowa in 1947 (Epperson 563). Most of her fiction is a mix of comedy and tragedy based around “Southern life” (Epperson 563). She put her views and beliefs into her fiction. She believed that, “the more we learn about ourselves, the deeper into the unknown we push the frontiers of fiction” (O’Connor 566). O’Connor wrote “The Displaced Person” to show her audience what the atrocities of racism can cause. She exaggerated and emphasized the theme of racism in her characters, allowing them to carry a meaning “larger than [themselves]” (O’Connor 567). O’Connor saw the racism of the south not only against the African-American population, but also those who were “displaced” by the war in Europe while growing up in a small town in the South. She wishes for her readers to recognize sin and in doing this she leans towards the drama that involves “loss of the soul” (O’Connor…

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