The Dilemma Of Diversity In David Brooks's People Like Us

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David Brooks, who is a successful journalist, columnist, and self - described “comic sociologist” at The New York Times, communicates the dilemma of diversification in his expository essay “People Like Us”. The writer thinks that people should encourage diversity to perceive and esteem each other 's different reflection. David Brooks demonstrates why all different kinds of humans are attracted to identical and similar races, ethnicities, religions, beliefs, political values, and classes in his essay based on typical examples surrounding us. Author’s convincible thoughts give interesting questions to readers include me, and it makes us reflecting and considering one more time with the necessity of diversity in not only America but also the global …show more content…
According to Brooks, Americans aware, and understand that the U.S. consists of various races and beliefs, but they do not carefully consider, and believe the necessity of diversity. “What we are looking at here is human nature. People want to be around others who are roughly like themselves. That is called community”(Brooks 309). The author of this essay asserts this interesting phenomenon with human instinct. This event to live, dwell, and settle with the similar people can be understood by analyzing human’s behavior of natural inclination. Because people crave to converse and share their emotions and opinions with corresponding people, Brooks argues, “Geography is not the only way we find ourselves divided from people unlike us. Some of us watch Fox News while others listen to NPR...Americans tend more and more often to marry people with education levels similar to their own, and to befriend people with backgrounds similar to their own”(Brooks 308). He shows particular cases of how people find similar characters in this quotation. However, the author also warns and notifies against this situation, which is human grouping with similar people, who have identical ideas. Personally, I feel bad about my un-diverse life at these points. I think all my American friends can sympathize with this view, which Brooks said in his essay. People, who live …show more content…
At the end of the essay, the author said, “Maybe you should stop in at a mega-church. Sure, it would be superficial familiarity, but it beats the iron curtains that now separate the nation 's various cultural zones”(Brooks 310). People need to experience with other beliefs such as different views of opinions and dissimilar kinds of considerations for the deep understanding diverse side of the ideas. Familiar materials and ideas can comprehend easier than unfamiliar thoughts. A society and community with many ideas can help to contact, understand, and reflect various viewpoints of people, who live in that group. For example, joining another club, going another church, experiencing different kinds of new ideas, and concepts. The author of this essay, David Brooks, also explains that beginning with new little suggestions such as ‘do not think about the enormous plan’, and ‘focus on the few valuable new understandings’. Unfamiliar, and puny experiences became significant understanding and esteeming minds after the countless tiny different practices. These kinds of his solutions make me feel compelled to seek solutions such as ‘what is the realistic way for me to make healthy diversity surrounding myself?’ or ‘how college students like us can create community, which love diversity in college?’ The essay “People like us” gives question marks to every reader include me, who read

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