The Differentification Of Settlements In The Chesapeake And New England's Century

1035 Words 5 Pages
During the mid 1500’s, England’s population completely proliferated. Europe, as a whole, underwent the process of enclosure. This meant land was being fenced in for the use of farming, causing the poor to be left with little to no land at all. Areas of England were also struggling economically, leaving a mass amount of the British population to lose their jobs. With the loss of jobs and lost hope of acquiring any land, the British set their sights on the New World. Many journeyed across the Atlantic to populate a variety of areas, ranging from the West Indies to Virginia and Massachusetts’s Bay. Although both the Chesapeake and New England regions were settled by the white English, by 1700 both evolved into distinct societies due to economic, …show more content…
In the New England colonies, their financial sustenance depended on the idea of unity. A society in which not a select few would prosper in luxury, but the community as a whole would live with the necessities. (Doc A) John Winthrop, a strict Puritan, proudly demonstrates this belief of representing God through hard work in his 1630, A Model of Christian Charity. The idea of conversion motivated Puritans in New England’s Massachusetts Bay to work in harmony and be selfless. (O.I.) This however did not translate to the ethics of the Chesapeake settlers. Settlements like Virginia were populated with independent, gold-hungry men with the intentions of gaining wealth. (Doc F) Captain John Smith pitifully illustrates the lack of priorities and structure in the Virginia settlement in his 1624, History of Virginia. Because of the restricting geographic features of each region, a difference of partaken industries developed. The narrow rivers, …show more content…
The vast majority of those who migrated had missions for glory, gold, or God. (O.I) Through the demographic, it becomes evident that those who migrated for God settled along the New England region. Puritans and separatists dominated this area, more specifically the Massachusetts Bay. With the idea of “a city upon a hill” these English settlers lived to set an example to society, live pure lives, and please God. (Doc A) John Winthrop passionately reinforces this idea to fellow Puritans in A Model of Christian Charity. Their religious values tied together with economy. Moderate profit to serve God and others were more accepted than the enrichment of one person. (Doc E) The 1636 Articles of Agreement that were enforced in Springfield, demonstrate the New England settlers’ motives to spread their beliefs. (Doc D) Thus the Halfway Covenant was formed in 1662, this extended partial church rights to bring the New Englanders back to their original religious purpose. (O.I) Settlers within Chesapeake were Catholic; although they were religious, it was never to the extent displayed by the Puritans. Those in the southern colonies were more driven by glory or gold. This caused the focus to stray away from reiterating religious values thus become more religious tolerant. The Maryland Toleration Act passed in 1649, which extended rights to Christians, was an outcome of the growing tolerance.

Related Documents