Skin Color In The Civil Rights Movement

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When the Civil Rights Movement began in the 1950s it was the beginning of a new future for African Americans. The Civil Rights Movement was a movement to gain basic rights for African Americans (Davis, 2014). It created the rights that said the difference of skin color between black and white people made no difference, both races deserved the same treatment. Since the Civil Rights Movement racial equality has improved through things such as African American’s government roles, and their rights in everyday life. But even today, where skin color should make no difference, black people still experience segregation.
African Americans had received abuse solely for their skin color since the first one had step foot on North America in 1619 (History.com
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Board of Education case the supreme court ruled that public facilities could not be segregated. In 1964 the Civil Rights Act ended all state segregation, and local laws requiring segregation (“Racial Segregation in the United States”, 2016). Since then American has been open to Black and White people, freely. While not all people agreed with this movement at first, many have come around to believe it was the right thing. Black people have been in the United States almost as long as white people have, but the minute they came they were treated differently. And up until the Civil War the idea of black people being equal was farcical idea. Even after the Civil War African Americans still felt the full force of their skin color. The Civil Rights movement came just in time, changing the way black skinned people could live. It gave them the right to eat, learn, and use the bathroom in the same place as white people. It gave them the right to have the same benefits of a white person. It was the final straw that showed black people that they were equal regardless of the color of their skin. But, even with this colossal breakthrough sometimes today their are still people that have problems with skin color, feeling that because their skin is black, they are somehow inferior. Since the Civil Rights Movement racial equality has improved through things such as African American’s government roles, and their rights in everyday life. But even today, where skin color should make no difference, black people still experience

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