The Differences Between Colorism And Racism

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The various articles included within Shades of Difference discuss the dynamic complexities and differences of colorism and racism, two terms that have been incorrectly used interchangeably for years by society to refer to generalized, racist phenomena. However just like Trina Jones explained in “The Case for Legal Recognition of Colorism Claims,” colorism is the maltreatment of another based on their skin color, while racism is the prejudicial and stereotypical beliefs one holds and perpetuates towards another based on their racially assigned group. Color may be used to assign others to a group but despite the contrary, is not an actual indicator of race, although its ideas are similar to Brazilians. “With racism, it is the social meaning afforded …show more content…
Although racial mixing has occurred since the beginning of time, this may increase colorism’s distinction as a prominent occurrence and also increase skin color’s role as an indicator of race, while the self-identification and others’ imposed identifications may become increasingly varied as skin color does (Nakano Glenn, 2009). This idea is supported by Edward Telles’s “The Social Consequences of Skin Color in Brazil because he writes that black identification in the U.S and Brazil varies greatly because darker hues deem one black in Brazil and lighter ones may allow one to ‘pass’ or escape black demonization especially if their education and SES is comparably high. However even the smallest trace of black ancestors could qualify an American as black as historically supported by the one drop rule in the 19th century, thus …show more content…
A new hierarchical system that may begin to increasingly dominate racial categorization in the states is the concept of a triracial system where whites remain at the top, and then honorary whites underneath, consisting of light skinned Latino Americans, and Asians such as Japanese Americans, Korean Americans, Chinese Americans, and Asian Indians. Blacks stay at the bottom but now consist of Filipino Americans, Vietnamese Americans, Hmong Americans, Laotian Americans, dark skinned Latino Americans, African Americans, and Native Americans, as described by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva and David R. Dietrich in “The Latin Americanization of U.S Relations.” They also noted that Middle Eastern Americans would be part of the honorary group, however due to recent controversies after 9/11 that have contributed to their demise, this is not likely. This idea introduces new terms such as porosity that describe change up or down the triangle, while pigmentocracy is their ranking by cultural influences and filtrations, such as education and

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