The Role Of Poverty In Young America

Good Essays
The delicacy of the early republic was exposed through the ever increasing, and consequently more apparent, impecunious people. Young America was in the midst of an agrarian lifestyle, which shifted into the preference of a metropolitan invested one. This metropolitan preference is said, according to Seth Rockman, to be what led families to become reliant on “government assistance to stay afloat” (2). However, officials, and government reliant citizens, hastily discerned that aid was not enough. Along with this recognition, many people were confused and by the poor as Mathew Carey stated, “…poverty out of place ‘in a country furnished like ours, with such an abundance of the fruits of the earth, and such ample means of comfortable livelihood’” …show more content…
Proportionally, with this hamper on the community established, there was a robust awareness of a dawning threat (4). In 1818, John Griscom discusses the “misguided benevolence, and imprudent systems of relief” which subsequently led to the rise in poverty to The New York’s Society for the Prevention of Pauperism (49). Griscom continues to discuss the causes of poverty listing ignorance, idleness, intemperance in drinking, hasty marriages, lotteries, pawnbrokers, houses of ill fame, and the abundance of charitable institutions within a city as the characteristics promoting poverty (51-53). Upon reviewing the article, the semantics entails animosity as Griscom explains that these are seemingly the only reasons as to why one would lack wealth. Moreover, in Philadelphia a committee examines poverty only to conclude that outdoor aid, which is less regulated, to be condemned and if the poor wants aid then they must submit themselves to heavily regulated almshouses …show more content…
Several principles were considered, including that the punishment of a crime does not strongly defer an individual from said crime but rather the individual’s own morality (84). Furthermore, within the early republic it is deemed that “vices” are the unequivocal reasons for poverty; the way to fix this would be to “instruct the ignorant, to encourage industry, and to restrain from the most noxious vices” (84). Through this article the society of Boston has definitively found that having a strong moral backbone, through religion, coincides with affluence. The aforementioned documents reveal the impressions the prosperous have of the impoverished. Altogether, reformers were under economic pressures and knew that the name of their beloved nation was at risk. These pressures eventually led to frustration hence leading to the wealthy to take their frustrations out on the less fortunate. The well-off then sought for common variables between the lower class in order to blame the people directly and to avoid the criticism of what should be a burgeoning economy. For the upper class, to blame the eyesore of society, the sufferers, was solely the meekest

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Immigrants, like rural workers, were attracted to urbanized American cities in search of opportunity. They were also subjected to the same ill fate of factory workers citizens endured. However, not only did immigrants have to deal with poverty, but they also had to battle the adversity of making a living in an unwelcome country. Similar to how poor white farmers tolerated slaves so there would be someone lower than themselves, citizens antagonized immigrants so there would be someone to blame for their struggles. Influenced by xenophobic politicians, citizens were convinced that immigrants were stealing jobs, being the reason for overpopulation, and according to particularly conservative Democrats, the reason for diminishing Catholicism.…

    • 910 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Moreover, in “For Richer, for Poorer” (2012, p.4), the author states the inequality hinders the poor to get the chance of education, triggers a hatred for the rich, and is a threat to the development of the society. In other words, people feel resentful toward the rich if they lose their opportunity for education. The hatred of the rich psychological increasingly affects the constructing of the harmonious society. As a result, the unfair treatment and opportunity threatening the stability of the…

    • 735 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Clearly, Jay Gatsby’s failure to be appreciated by the Old Money despite his wealth demonstrates that the American Dream is flawed. Sadly, the more effort the lower class put in to realizing the American Dream, the more the upper class forcibly oppress and exploit them because the upper class in a social stratified society feel that they are entitled to subjugate those who are inferior to them. In essence, the American Dream is beautiful on the outside. The sobering truth, however, is that it is elusive and ugly…

    • 1851 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    (Andersen 208) Those rich countries can’t use their own population for their production because the labor is heavily expensive in their country and the economy will drop down. However, they use poor country who needs money because labor is cheaper. Social inequality pushed the core countries to send jobs overseas and thus those exploited countries tend to migrate in thinking that all the work is inside, which leads the economy to drop because everyone needs to be…

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Cohen concludes that the socialist economy was clearly better on the camping trip, because it became toxic once they started to act like capitalists (Cohen). To his point, in a Capitalist economy people are forced to provide for themselves and their families, because there is no guarantee of resources, and while that might encourage people to work harder, it also encourages corrupt business practices. Everything is based around profit, not quality, equality, honesty, or generosity. Products are being made not for the good of society but for the profit they will produce. Leading to companies aiming for quantity and marketability rather than quality, resulting in the consumers suffer.…

    • 784 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    There has to be a resistance, one force that opposes the Capitol. Just like Gale urged in Mockingjay, there is a good side and a bad side, and no turning back; this is evident even in our own world (Mockingjay, pg185). In the Hunger Games, there is such a drastic gap between the wealthy and the poor, and it serves as a mirror to the gap that exists in the U.S. Knowing that humans have a habit of putting themselves in the best position of possible, we know that everyone would pick being wealthy over being poor. But this situation would give the opportunity to put the wealthy people into the poor’s shoes, and hopefully once they step out of the situation, they can see that the wealth is not as equally distributed as they may have thought. It is difficult to see things that are wrong in the world when you are focused on your own gain.…

    • 1710 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Marx observed that throughout history there was one class which controlled or oppressed another for economic gain, for example, in the feudal system, or with the bourgeois class and the proletariat. Eventually, the oppressed would revolt due to their misery, changing the system of class structure. (Marx 1986, p.226-227). Marx believed that eventually, a socialist and later communist society would overcome the capitalistic system, where the workers would no longer be oppressed but would have control over their economic production. Moreover, Marx believed that the method of production and division of labour was detrimental to the worker, as the roles forced upon him dehumanised him and caused alienation.…

    • 968 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    While the working class was out of jobs and struggling to make a living, the upper class went about flaunting their wealth. Additionally, the upper class began resenting what they believed to be unnecessary aid from the New Deal programs. According to them, the unemployment of the working class was of no fault but their own. The Great Depression altered the traditional conceptions of family life, and job competition led to an increase in discrimination. During this time of increasing unemployment, many men lost their jobs and were not capable of providing for their families.…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Poverty

    • 1096 Words
    • 5 Pages

    There are five distinct reasons for poverty that you need to know. History, former colonies have trouble accessing land, capital, education, and other resources necessary to support themselves. War and political instability, the poorest countries have all experienced a civil war in the 20th century. They also have weak governments that can 't protect them. Most poor countries lack safety, stability, and security, these things are essential for prosperity and growth.…

    • 1096 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This haunts the poor with ideas of what they could have and take away from the rich, while haunting the rich of what they could lose. The second cause is seen in an egalitarian society in which all citizens have equal opportunity. Tocqueville specified, “the most marked inequalities do not strike th eye; when everything is nearly on the same level, the slightest are marked enough to hurt it.” The more equality progresses the harder it is to satisfy the desire for equality which contributes to mass consumption and noticeable wealth between the American populace. Thirdly, the availability of land and natural resources has created people that are fearless but have immense passion. The passion sparking the fear of not obtaining what is presented to him by fortune.…

    • 844 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics