Definition Of Justice Essay

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The definition of justice is subjective. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines justice as “the maintenance or administration of what is just especially by the impartial adjustment of conflicting claims or the assignment of merited rewards or punishments” and “the establishment or determination of rights according to the rules of law or equity.” Justice is the upholding of what is morally and legally right in the eyes of the law and those that create it. It is the pursuit of truth. And as much as the justice system tries to be efficient and effective in the execution of justice, the pursuit of what is right should and does take priority. Victims and Accused both have rights and the justice system should value them equally. In my observations, I found that the justice system does not sacrifice equity and the rights of the accused over efficiency and I will use three cases as examples of it. These cases are, R v. Adams, an adult plea case; R v. Marcil, a bail hearing; and R v. LaFleur, a youth court …show more content…
LaFleur exemplifies this. It was a sentencing hearing for a break and enter case charged under section 348 of the criminal code of Canada. The Judge was L’Oignon, Defense was John Boss, and the Crown was Ms. McVey. On October 24th of 2014, the accused and two other individuals entered a group home at 1am. The other two entered a bedroom while the accused waited in the hallway. The next morning the Victim awoke to find money missing, in denominations of 100 dollar bills. The accused was arrested the following day after being caught on camera, and he had a 100 dollar bill on his person. The Judge had charged the Accused through section 810 of the criminal code in regards to recognisance then the charges would be dropped. They also said that deterrence, rehabilitation, and mitigating factors played a role in sentencing. The sentence was a 500 dollar fine, and an order to keep the peace and have no contact with the other individuals involved for 8

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