Is Evil Good Or Bad

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Framing reference based on simple word definition, the term “evil” is best described as “morally reprehensible; sinful, wicked, arising from actual or imputed bad character or conduct.” (Merriam Webster) However, this is simply a Standard Definition, and is thus excessively exclusive in nature. For that reason, it may also be characterized as a Qualifying Definition, though in either case the description is relatively direct and specific, leaving little to no room for further contemplation or discussion. Despite this, there are other forms of definition with which one can define this word, and a myriad of ways to do it, as well, in various manners that are more creative in nature and not as black and white, though the dictionary definition …show more content…
And, within those direct specifications, there is also copious space for individual interpretation and thought- again, that frame of different wood and different shape, a different picture, but a frame nonetheless. From this, one could draw the conclusion that “evil is not good,” and from there, “good is not evil.” This extended definition supports the above definition that “Evil is the absence of good,” but before this can be entirely taken to proof the word “Good must be standardly defined, as well. And, according to Merriam Webster’s dictionary, good is represented as “of a favorable character or tendency.” Using this definition, evil is “The absence of a favorable character or tendency.” (Though it should be noted that this definition raises more problems still, as each person’s morals and ideals are reflected in what they see as favorable tendencies; this, in turn, reflects what they see as good, which will then dictate their perception of …show more content…
A person can define it through description, by talking about Hitler or specifically referencing a quote from Mein Kampf; the same goes for defining through Example or even Comparison. The point being pressed here is that any word, specifically “Evil,” can be defined endlessly, and the words used to define it as equally endless. It’s impact is relative entirely on how a person lives and their outlook on the world, and the definition created here, in this essay, is a construct of jumble diction based on incoherent thought that thousands of firing neurons created and formed together into an idea based on the opinions and thought process of one individual. Just because it may (or may not) make sense to the reader does not mean they must accept it entirely- a Deconstructionist would say that words have no real meaning at all, and would in fact be largely in support of “Defining by Antonyms.” Though even with all this considered, the meaning of evil has still hopefully been somewhat illuminated to the reader, or, at the very least, made them consider their own meaning of the word, and moved them to some sort of jumbled thought of their

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