The Declaration Of Independence: Politics For The People

Decent Essays
Politics for the People The Enlightenment era was a time that internationally changed the realm of politics and human rights. Without the influence and the ideas of several philosophers from this time period, the basic rights and liberties that Americans have today would perhaps not exist. The American government, eventually formed from a revolution against Great Britain, could even be seen as a direct result of the Enlightenment ideas on politics, as many of the early documents are said to be inspired by the ideas in the writings of John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and some of the founding fathers involved in the Continental Congress responsible for the Declaration of Independence were also significant philosophers of the Enlightenment …show more content…
. .” (Reader, pp. 448-449) These unalienable rights mentioned are rights that are presumed to be natural, as in universal to all people, but when the colonists were not being fairly represented by the government of Great Britain, which they were still expected to abide by, they felt like those rights were not being given to them, and so they revolted against their homeland. Prior to the beginning of the revolution, Great Britain had been doing things such as sending troops to wage war in the colonies, imposing unfair taxes and blocking off trade to other parts of the world, and making legislative decisions for the colonists without any say from the colonists themselves. (Reader, p. 450) The extensive listing of grievances to the king just went to show how fed up the colonists were, and made the revolution seem justifiable under the circumstances given. In contemporary America, specific ideas from the Declaration of Independence may not appear to be of any importance to human rights today, as the natural rights – life, liberty, and property (also known as the pursuit of happiness) – are only briefly mentioned in the beginning of the document, but without it, America would not have been able to move towards developing its own rights for their citizens that would later be documented in the Constitution and its eventual

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    The American Revolution lasted from 1765 to 1776 until the Americans finally decreed independence from Britain through the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. This significant document was written by Thomas Jefferson who wrote about the unalienable rights about the colonists and listed the tyrannic deeds done by King George III to the colonists. Many of these deeds listed were valid to an extent but it was also very one-sided and biased. America had the right to become independent, however the charges leveled in the Declaration of Independence against the King were too biased and one-sided to be valid reasons for independence. Economically, the charges against the king were not valid because the British had the right to economically…

    • 1007 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, not everyone was pleased with the idea of having a king ruling over the colonists from overseas. Although colonial America acquired democratic features, the undemocratic features created numerous problems for the colonists, thus causing them to declare independence from Britain. Even though, the colonists had…

    • 1137 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One of the fifteen statements he talked about was, “He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.” (Declaration of Independence). Due to the lack of the king following the laws, it became easier for the colonist to rebel against the crown and the parliament. Even though the colonist believed as themselves to be English gentlemen they still were not offered the same right as the English gentlemen that resided in Britain. The Englishmen who resided in Britain were taxed appropriately and had control over their own homes and did not have to abide by the Quartering Act even though the Englishmen in the colonies had to. Thomas Paine published his pamphlet, Common Sense.…

    • 839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He countered those of the opinion that America needed Great Britain in order to thrive with the argument that America would have probably succeeded much better without the interference of Britain. He also argued that Britain’s interest in America was purely selfish and for its own gain (“Reading the American Past” 121). He believed that the only way America could truly flourish was by gaining its own independence and creating a “continental form of government” (“Reading the American Past” 122). Ultimately, colonists like Thomas Paine viewed the American Revolution as a means to a better end. They saw the atrocities Great Britain had committed against them, such as families being killed and property destroyed, and decided the only option was to cut ties with Britain (“Reading the American Past” 122).…

    • 883 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Infringement of Rights in the Colonies The American Revolution must be viewed as much more than the want for separation from the mother country. Parliament not only disregards the fact that the colonies should live and abide by the same laws and liberties within the realms of England, but treats the colonies as if they are much less than what they are. The hunger for power in England ultimately ensued the end of their rule in the colonies. The American Revolution must be considered a defense of traditional notions of English liberty because the king repeatedly strips the colonies from the same freedoms that the people inside England have. Many colonists’ want for the separation from England is no secret by the time the Stamp Act Congress…

    • 1029 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This is exactly what the United States did in order to remove the British from power, we created the declaration of independence in order to get the point across that we need to be well independent. Without the declaration of independence we would not have the luxury of “Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”(Jefferson). Citizens of the United States under British control were not happy, they were constantly being taxed for things that tax did not need to be on…

    • 1297 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    They certainly did not want an equal balance between slaves and masters, propertyless and property holders, Indians and white” (Zinn 101). This is very agreeable is some ways and disagreeable in another. Zinn makes a good point that the Founding Fathers had a mindset to gain for themselves and have ultimate power, but that doesn’t mean that the American Revolution did not progress the new nation in some shape or form. Economically, the common people were still living under the control of the elites, but there were significant amount of changes for women and slaves and most importantly, America’s government. In conclusion, the American Revolution led it’s nation to changes that are politically and socially, but not…

    • 881 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    With this mindset, the British felt thoroughly displeased with the lack of respect shown by colonists. Because both sides were rooted in their beliefs as to who was wrong, colonists decided to act by issuing the Declaration of Independence and igniting the American Revolution. The impact of the American Revolution extends far beyond what the original colonists may have thought. The ideals of the new nation prospered into a global superpower that sets the precedence for human rights and democracy. However, colonists are not the only group to receive credit for the ideological breakthrough of the revolution.…

    • 800 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One of the largest differences in these two wars is seen in the outcome. The American Revolution for a large part fulfilled its main goal, while the French Revolution did not succeed at making the changes they wanted. The colonists in America were fighting for independence from Britain, and when the war had ended, that is what they had. The United States became completely separate and was not controlled by the English. In contrast, while the French people wanted a change in government from a monarchy to a republic, they did not get what they fought for, instead the government became a dictatorship, the same or possibly worse that the previous monarchal situation.…

    • 1428 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    1764 To 1773 Dbq Analysis

    • 803 Words
    • 4 Pages

    This contributed to the American Revolution as most did not feel loyal or like they belonged to Britain. Americans at this point were mostly loyal to their state, as the wider American national identity developed after the revolution. Despite this, each of the states knew that they wanted to be independent of Britain and therefore rebelled in the revolution. The removal of French colonists to the west also made the Americans question Britain’s power over them and the idea developed that the Americans no longer needed to be under British control. The proclamation line enforced by Britain suggests that it may have been trying to avoid Americans gaining too much power and declaring independence.…

    • 803 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays