The Declaration Of Independence And The American Declaration Of Independence

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The Revolutionary Era During the time of the Revolutionary wars within America, France, and Haiti, there are differing opinions of independence. By evaluating each source given, the variations are evident. In terms of these revolutions, each county’s idea of liberty has several different meanings. For example, the United States discusses that all are entitled to certain unalienable rights, among them are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Whereas, the Declaration of Rights of Man and Citizen in France, states that men are born free and equal in rights. The Haitian Declaration of Independence points out the motive for the Declaration is to abolish slavery. Even though every Declaration argues for liberty, each has its own meaning …show more content…
The American Revolution is just the beginning of the Revolutionary Era. A short time later the French Revolution begins, the Saint-Domingue Constitution followed, and the Haitian Declaration of Independence develops soon after. Each of my sources includes the purpose for these rebellions. The modernization of the American colonies sets the example for other innovations to come. The Atlantic Ocean was used as a waterway to countries for the purposes of trade, ideas of liberty, and for the knowledge necessary to survive. The Declaration of Independence is the first to give people unalienable rights, including life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It gives the people a chance to alter the government if they believe that government is destructive. Governors may not impose new laws unless these laws are in dire need for due process. This Declaration separates the American colonies from the British and absolves them from the British Crown. By doing this, the colonies put a firm dependence on each other, including lives, fortunes, and sacred …show more content…
It is the Haitian belief that death is preferred over the inhumane government of the French. By splitting from France, the Haitian Declaration of Independence looks upon the island in a new way, declaring “Look upon the people to see what the results of the French government has done to the citizens.” Separating from France and advancing toward the future, the goal is to “Let us ensure, however, that a missionary spirit does not destroy our work; let us allow our neighbors to breathe in peace; may they live quietly under the laws that they have made for themselves.” The main objective for the Haitians describes new leaders whose day has come to make glory and independence eternal for all Haitians. Looking at each of these revolutions, the idea of control being within their own government is the main

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