The Death Penalty: The Price Society Pay

1158 Words 5 Pages
The Death Penalty: The Price Society Pays The death penalty has been a topic of controversy for centuries, known for its inhumane brutality methods which have evolved over the years from lynching to gassing, electrocuting and now the lethal injection; it is in fact the sentencing of those who have committed a heinous crime. On the other hand, justice has been served when the death penalty has finally been executed on the prisoner, bringing a sense of retribution to those who have lost a loved one due to the crime committed. Although many people might think it is a working system, others land in the mixture of controversy for various reasons. Over the course of time, the death penalty has started to become obsolete and is slowly making a turnover …show more content…
In Florida, The Miami Herald reported in 1988 that the cost of the death penalty per execution was 3.2 million dollars verses the 600,000 for life imprisonment. In North Carolina, professors at Duke University reported in 1993 that the death penalty cost 2.16 million more per execution verses murder cases with life imprisonment (McLaughlin 689). In other research, it has been established that the modern day death penalty is more costly than the alternative punishment of life imprisonment without parole. The variations of these costs for capital punishment not only include cases in which the prisoner is executed, but also in those cases where the death penalty is pronounced but never end with an execution. These cases also include costs for the necessary appeals and trials to prove a prisoner guilty (Radelet and Borg 50). While the societal pendulum swings from keeping the death penalty to abolishing it, one thing is for certain; a light has been shined on the cost of the death penalty and the reflection of its effectiveness is shining through. These numbers are just a few statistics that show how much the death penalty is costing the hard working men and women of this …show more content…
By October of 2007, the cost of defending the inmate reaches 1.8 million dollars (Wood 174.) Ultimately, between the prosecutions and the defense, his trial almost amounted to 6 million dollars. Viewing these amounts some states have decided to consider other alternatives for the death penalty. In Colorado it is estimated that the money they spend on capital cases and appeals is close to 40 million dollars; they recently considered abolishing the death penalty in order to free funds to use for cold cases (Wood 183). In California, since 1978, prosecutors deem thousands to the death penalty, hundreds of capitally charged defendants to death row, and only thirteen executions have taken place. During mid-2012, 725 sentenced inmates overcrowd the dilapidated death row, and yet executions remained on hold (Petersen and Lynch 1238). The California Commission on the Fair Administration of Justice (CCFAJ) were able to provide a rough estimate of the cost of capital punishment in their state. It was estimated that California currently spends $137.7 million on death penalty related costs each year. Breaking down the cost between pretrial and trial costs at $20 million, $54.4 million each year for the cost of state level appeals and habeas proceedings, and

Related Documents