The Death Of Hedeki Tojo, Edward King, And Filipinos

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During the times of WWII, a series of brutal men were attempting to control the world: Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, and Benito Mussolini. That’s just some of the examples from other occurring genocide in the World. In this case the Japanese, there are men involved that go by the name of Hedeki Tojo, Edward King Jr., and Homma Masaharu. At the end of it all Homma Masaharu was help responsible for the death march, “war crime” and was finally executed by a firing squad on the day of April 3rd, 1946. These men listed before were all involved in taking over the Americans, and Filipinos on a 65-mile Death March, from the Southern end of the Bataan Peninsula, all the way to San Fernando (Networks, 2016). This took place several hours right after the …show more content…
In addition to that the American and Filipino defenders of Luzon, which is where the island where Manila is located, were also forced to make their way to the Bataan Peninsula. At the end of the three months, the Japanese invaded and combined US and Filipino army, despite a lack of naval and air support (Networks, 2016). At the start of this the Japanese were very successful, because of how well the Japanese had outnumbered the United States and Filipino forces. These forces held for 99 days, and were forced to surrender to the Japanese on April 9th 1942 (Alchin, 2016). The Bataan Death March consisted of 66 miles, which is also 106km, journey, all including 12,000 Americans and the rest were Filipinos (Alchin, 2016). Now not only did the Japanese just target the Americans and the Filipinos, the Death March also included 75,000 Japanese prisoners of war. They included their own people. During this march, it was described to have “severe physical abuse, atrocities” which was done by all the Japanese leaders. The Japanese prisoners on this march were beaten, shot, bayoneted, and in several other cases they were beheaded (Alchin, …show more content…
Ralph Radriguez told interviewers he was “not a hero” This man didn’t even want to talk about his “wartime experiences” or “surviving” the Death March. Rodriguez said the only reason he talks about it now “is to help the others remember.” The ninety-eight-year-old man stood outside Saturday’s ceremony with everybody else who was celebrating the survivors and still living veterans of the Bataan Death March. Out of 100 men who showed up to the Bataan Memorial Building on Galisteo Street Rodriquez was one. The men were very respectful to their fellow veterans, these memories were “too painful to remember, and too tragic to not.” The 74th annual meeting/ gathering is just a number, the next year, the 75th, will be just a number. But they are all so special. Each year the number of members still alive dwindle away. 9 soldiers have died since last April, and about 9 died the year before that. All the years they have coming are “oh so significant.” The number of survivors get smaller each year, in the year of 2016 is about 20, and 8 of them are living in New Mexico. The youngest man out of them all is about the age of 90 (Surviving the Bataan Death March , 2015). At this year’s event only three were able to show up and see the others. Rodriguez who is 98, William Overmier who is 97, and Atilano “Al” David who is 95. (Surviving the Bataan Death March ,

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