The Influence Of Texting And Driving

1110 Words 5 Pages
Per year, thousands of people are killed in horrific, involuntary car accidents; the fault of these deaths can be placed on the driver and in some cases, the pedestrian. But besides the most common thought reason for accidents, drinking while driving, the use of cellphones stands as the second most common source of motor accidents and deaths according to ProCon.org. Driving while texting is a horrible habit for most teens and adults in today’s society. In America there are thousands of deaths annually due to the distraction that cellphones pose for drivers. Not only do the overwhelming habits of texting and checking our phones consume our lives, but as they become integrated into our driving, we are more prone to distractions and less wary …show more content…
As a society we are becoming too involved with our electronics. Smartphones are now the new evolution of media; we use them for all aspects of our lives, such as in texting, calling, social media, and emails. State Farm even writes that “smartphone ownership is growing, in 2011, 52 percent of drivers reporting owning a smartphone, and by 2014 that number had grown to 80 percent” (Distraction.gov). Though many see this rise in technology’s influence over us as beneficial to our progression, it serves to also hold us back from adopting proper social and behavioral habits. We are too focused on these devices that we lose track of what we are doing, especially when driving. As ProCon.org says, “Across America approximately 660,000 drivers are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving, a number that has held steady since 2010.” In a progressive, faced paced society, we as individuals are faced with many distractions and obligations to tend to. In response to this, laws and rules need to be updated to keep up with society’s progression, so we do not trip, fall, and …show more content…
As the NSC clarifies, “the benefits of using this communication device include the user’s own benefits, social networks, businesses, and communities,” however, not all benefits come from picking up a phone. Texting while driving does have the potential to help people communicate with others, or if you need to receive updates on the go- in this aspect, multitasking in the new norm. However, though there is always a time and place for phones, driving is not one of them. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration confirms that “ten percent of all drivers 15 to 19 years old involved in fatal crashes were reported as distracted at the time of the crashes. This age group has the largest proportion of driv­ers who were distracted at the time of the crashes.” To deal with the rising use of phones and similar technologies, the American federal government needs to anticipate the potential consequences that can, and will spread fast over the seasoned and amateur drivers. In adopting a law that will prohibit, citizens will not be oppressed and stripped of their right to buy what they want and when to use it, but will be obliged to put down their

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