The Dangers Of Illegal Immigration

1744 Words 7 Pages
There can be a lot said about a person or family who travels through thick and thin to reach a point in their life, where they can finally say they are grateful to have finally made it. But the journey, where they have to go through, is something extraordinary. The fact that these people have been labeled as an "illegal immigrant" or "illegal alien" is an insult to them. The definition of an illegal immigrant is defined as: "A foreigner who has entered or resides in a country unlawfully or without the country 's authorization" (Dictionary). However, the term "illegal" itself dehumanizes the person and unlawfully charges them instantly for a crime that needs them to be punished for. Labeling them as a criminal to their friends, families, and …show more content…
The only way possible to enter a country legally is by either having a relative who is over the age of 21, which could sponsor them and grant them legal access to the U.S or go through an abundance of tests that will either determine if they are a right fit to society. (Immigration Resources). But even then the amount of waiting could last over a year or more. This alone determines the idea that immigrants do not deserve the title of "illegal." Those who are illegal signify that they have once committed a crime in the past or near future. And in my honest opinion, I do not believe that people who are fighting in this country for their recognition do not deserve such a title or even be slightly compared to those who have done …show more content…
But in reality, if we grant those with a legal citizenship it will not necessarily cause an inflation of people to come into the U.S, as for example, in the year 1986 in the Immigration Reform and Control Act, of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta noticed that when amnesty was granted it did not increase the amount of people who were coming to America. (Comprehensive Immigration Reform). However, it did not stop future immigration from coming into the U.S, yet that was due to poor planning and not granting a supply of work visas for those who were lower skilled in jobs. Without the visas, people would have still continued to come back into the country illegally and work. With this said the "path to legalization for undocumented workers currently in the U.S is essential and probably inevitable." (Beyond Borders). The only other solution to this problem is rounding up all of the 7 million workers and send them back home, yet that alone would be more than expensive and total up to about $250 billion dollars. (Beyond Borders) So, in any case, it would be best to grant them a reform that can let them stay in the states and work

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