The Dangers Of Antibiotic Resistance

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Antibiotic resistance is the ability of bacteria to resist the effects of drugs (About Antimicrobial Resistance). It happens when the antibiotic loses its ability to control or kill bacterial growth in the human body. Even though resistance is a natural phenomenon that occurs like natural selection in bacteria, it should not be causing as much of a problem with humans as it has been increasingly through the years (General Background: About Antibiotic…). Antibiotic resistance can be naturally acquired by bacteria through horizontal or vertical gene transfer as well as bacteria having the ability to adopt “free” bacteria from the environment it is in (General Background: About Antibiotic…). The reason antibiotic resistance has become such a …show more content…
The people most at risk are people who are immunocompromised (Levy, Stuart B.). Examples of these people are generally people in a health care facility or nursing home. Patients going through things like chemotherapy, dialysis, or transplants are at very high risk because they are all immunocompromised. Also people who have rheumatoid arthritis are at high risk because the drugs they take can make them immunocompromised. Patients who have any kind of manmade device (catheter, pacemaker, and stents) are at high risk due to resistant biofilm that can produce an infection (Vicky, …show more content…
This program promotes the appropriate use of antibiotics, improves patient outcomes, decreases the spread of infections due to resistance, and also reducing resistance as a whole. Partnering with the American Hospital Association, APIC has put together a toolkit with items like patient, hospital, and clinician resources available through a link in order to help inform people about the appropriate use of antibiotics. APIC even has an entire program dedicated to reducing the effects of resistant Clostridium

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