Analysis Of The Danger Of A Single Story By Adichie

Better Essays
Bittersweet Prejudice
In the essay “The Danger of a Single Story” by Chimamanda Adichie, she describes her experiences with stereotypes, or “single stories”, she has heard about other cultures and her own that have created well-meaning but uneducated societies all across the world. With these experiences, she gives the point that there shouldn’t be a single story to anyone because they underestimate the victims of it and overlook their true stories of who they are. She proves this point by using a powerful yet playful tone.
Adichie first describes her point on the effects of a single story by using a strong and powerful tone. In the middle of the essay she talks about her experiences at home. She talks about how her cousin died because he couldn’t
…show more content…
At a closing point, there are examples of success when she talks about how hardworking and ambitious Nigerian people are, and how hard they tried to fix the stigma that they were all just a failed government. She talks about how her and a Nigerian publisher have dreams to build and refurbish libraries to open doors for the many kids of the country to tell their stories. Then, she says, “Stories matter. Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign, but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people, but stories can also repair that broken dignity.” (17:35). While ending the essay, Adichie is saying that there is more power to the positive stories than the negative. Single stories can almost dehumanize people, but many stories can build them up and restore their dignity. She shows again why single stories can underestimate and ignore who they really are when she outlines how many stories gives them their pride. Alongside of the point, she uses power in her small sentences. When she says, “Stories matter. Many stories matter.”, it shows how much she wants to get that across. There is strength in Adichie’s simplicity and that is how the point is forced into the audience’s heads. Power is an important part of showing meaning and Adichie shows that in her tone and words just how strong her feelings are towards single stories and how they should be

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    By saying this, the intended audience will feel emotionally indignant as they are reminded by the civil right movement and the dim result that they received from it. By feeling righteous anger, the audience will feel sympathetic with other women and feel the need to stop smiling falsely. Although her argument may sound convincing and compelling, she generalizes that all present-day women are incapable of going against societal expectation weakens her argument. In contemporary days, in my community, women challenge for their rights; these women are called feminists. They will firmly go against the will of society and eschew the negativity around them.…

    • 1407 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Lack of Persuasiveness The idea of “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All” can be a bold and touchy subject. A writer should be careful on the way the tone and language are presented so that their audience may take away exactly what they want. With the wrong tone or language, a writer could very easily misguide their audience the wrong direction in which they intended. Anne-Marie Slaughter presents respectable and clear examples when she discusses “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” which helps to be persuasive to her audience. The order of her examples and points she writes about throughout her article is suitable and well organized.…

    • 1446 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Feminism In Persepolis

    • 854 Words
    • 4 Pages

    By humanizing the forgotten people, it both challenges and dispels assumptions. In a way, Satrapi also confirms some of it as well. She is not afraid to show how horrifying some of it was, and the grief and suffering the revolution caused. Due to this, her novel is censored in Iran, adding to another point Marji brings to light; the actions of a few can change the lives of many. Persepolis breaks the wall of division for us, making it in an accessible format for all to read.…

    • 854 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Initially, the extreme views presented by Mr Collins are seen as offensive by modern day readers but alternatively, Austen is perhaps identifying the flaws in society, with the extreme language she use to suggest that the mockery Lydia is subjected to isn’t necessary. From this, the reader really understands Regency norms and the consequences for breaking social norms and sees that women have a standard to uphold or would be the subject of ridicule and derision from…

    • 357 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Humor Essay Many works of literature today have persuasive strategies incorporated in them to grab the reader’s attention. Most of the time, writers also use strategies such as humor to send a crucial message to the audience. While this is one effective way of sending a message, other writers utilize formal writing to express the seriousness of a problem. Both methods are effective in getting a message across; however, writing without humor is stronger than those with humor because it is straightforward and comprehensible. Works without the use of humor have a stronger effect on the readers due to the fact that writers get their point across right away, which make it easier for the audience to comprehend.…

    • 1049 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    My favorite point that Dorris writes is “When we’re in a group, we tend to think as that group does: we may even have joined the group to find ‘like-minded; people” (652). I find this extremely interesting because this is 100 percent true and when you relate it back to your own life it makes so much sense. I find Dorris is very good at getting the reader to relate to them selves, which is remarkable for a writer. Although Dorris is very informative and persuasive, she lacks sufficient evidence. When Lessing attempts to prove her valid points she vaguely mentions an experiment that was secondary information to her and does not use any details to describe what actually occurs in this experiment.…

    • 793 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Song Of Solomon Analysis

    • 514 Words
    • 3 Pages

    I was a bit apprehensive because this idea has the potential to go horribly awry and get a bit offensive, but Whaley handles it with the finesse of a great, educated writer and uses this as a platform to help readers understand mental health more properly. Bravo. I was also a bit worried about Lisa's characterization. She's not an outright anti-hero, but she is certainly an unlikable protagonist. Eventually, you learn more about her past and why she is the way she is and you begin to understand her more, but Solomon is so extremely likable that it is hard to truly love anyone who may be using him.…

    • 514 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Lizzy’s ability to tell to tell people what she does and doesn't like will come back to haunt her in Chapter 36 she finally comes to the conclusion that not everything that is thought needs to be said. "How despicably I have acted! I, who have prided myself on my discernment! I, who have valued myself on my abilities! who have often disdained the generous candour of my sister, and gratified my vanity in useless or blameable mistrust!…

    • 1405 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Hester also began to feel grateful of the letter on page 174 , when she thinks to herself, “The scarlet letter was her passport into regions where other women dared not tread. Shame, Despair, Solitude! ...they had made her strong, but taught her much amiss”. Hester is appreciative of the fact that through the hardships and isolation from society that the scarlet letter caused her to suffer, she became stronger. She learned how harsh society could be, and how quickly people could turn on you, even people you barely knew would judge and scrutinize you.…

    • 1126 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, she very intentionally goes on what seems to be an irrelevant tangent at first, but however soon becomes clearly very important. Brown brings up a situation every person can rather easily relate to on different levels, the hypothetical of being told “thirty-seven things you do really awesome, and one thing - an ‘opportunity for growth?’” and explaining how the single piece of constructive criticism occupies your mind much more than the obviously larger praise, and that this applies heavily to those she interviews, saying “when you ask people about love, they tell you about heartbreak,” “when you ask people about belonging, they’ll tell you their most excruciating experiences of being excluded,” and “when you ask people about connection, the stories they told me were about disconnection” (Brown). This is a powerful moment, as it allows the audience to reflect upon similar situations to the vague premises Brown proposes, and connect more with her speech. The emotional connections made here prompt the audience hangs on her every word as the talk…

    • 1887 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays