The Cuban Embargo: The Bay Of Pigs Crisis

1493 Words 6 Pages
One reason the Cuban embargo was established and approved by John F. Kennedy on Feb. 3, 1962 was to reduce “the threat posed by its alignment with the Communist powers” (Kennedy). Previous to this proclamation, the Cuban Revolution, nationalizing (to bring under the ownership or control of a nation, as industries and land) and confiscation (to seize as forfeited to the public domain) without reimbursing (to make repayment to for expense or loss incurred) of American property in Cuba, and the Bay of Pigs invasion occurred (Dictionary.com). These conflicts increased tension and distrust between the two nations. In the Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro and other guerrilla fighters (members of a band of irregular soldiers that uses guerrilla warfare, …show more content…
In response, President Eisenhower cuts sugar quotas in the US-controlled sugar Cuban sugar industry almost prepping them for a full embargo. At the Bay of Pigs Invasion on April 17, 1961 failed after only three days to lead to Kennedy’s full embargo on Feb. 7, 1962. In the 50 years since Kennedy enacted the embargo, a loss of about $1.126 trillion to Cuba’s economy has taken a toll on Cuban citizens and a heavy hit on Cuban economy (“UN urges end of US embargo on Cuba”). But in 1966, a Cuban Adjustment act passed by President Lyndon B. Johnson states that “refugees who have been in the country for 2 years or more can become permanent U.S. residents” (Johnson). This policy also entails that Cubans who flee from their home country and successfully reach the U.S., may apply to be naturalized a year after arriving. The embargo was restricted yet again on March 12, 1996 when the Helms-Burton Act was passed. This act laid out specifications for penalties and consequences for violating the embargo and set specific requirements and conditions Cuba would need to meet in order for the embargo to be …show more content…
Since the Cuban embargo was enacted in 1962, Cuba’s growth rate has decreased from 2.2% to -.10% meaning the Cuban population is emigrating for various reasons including finding a better place to live and raise a family (Cuba Population). In 2014, the number of births exceeded the number of deaths by only 28,314 people which equivalents only .0025% of its current population (Cuba Population). Cuba is a beautiful country whose natural charms should be exposed to the world. The island earned the nickname “Pearl of the Antilles” from Christopher Columbus in 1515 through its natural splendor and it could be rediscovered by nature enthusiasts currently restricted from travel there. Tourists and family of Cuban citizens would find travel to Cuba easier to achieve and the economy of Cuba could be rekindled on the profits of tourism. With an emerging private sector and middle class, these profits could benefit the poor and provide the middle class with potential business opportunities. These businesses could be taken away from the citizens by the government as easily as they are approved, but if guidelines are kept the middle class could prosper. American businesses could seek business or labor in Cuba as well, benefitting Cuban citizen’s, by providing a broader spectrum of potential job opportunities, and American businesses, by expanding their

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