The Sympathetic Monster In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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“Now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, the breathless and horror filled my heart” (Shelley, 26). These were the words of Victor Frankenstein, a young ambitious scientist, when he brought life to a human-like creature he made from human remains. Scared from the result of his creation, he fled and abandoned him. Now alone, the hideous looking creation, often referred to as a monster, desired for acceptance, but he was forced to experience the cruelties of men. With determination and resentment to find the answers, he pursued to find his creator, but cruelty had challenged him throughout his journey. Frankenstein, a thrilling story written by Mary Shelley, introduced the readers to the ironic meaning of “sympathetic monster”, …show more content…
Filled with determination, he started his quest to find his creator. He traversed the countryside and fields. Not even hunger stopped him. Driven by his innocence, he assumed to be treated like a human, but he was ostracized. Some people shrieked and fainted, but most of them grievously attacked him even if he has done nothing wrong. At one time, he even saved a girl’s life from drowning, but the cruel judgement of a man immediately was imposed upon him; he was shot. He quietly endured the pain, pondered all the sufferings and physical abuses of men, and he thrived not to harm them back. Confused, he tried to discover what prompted man to such motives and behavior. He hid himself in a hovel where he observed a beautiful family. The curious creature discovered the beauty of man’s values and morals, sadness and joy, sorrow and self-sacrifice, virtues and vices, pain and pleasure, good and evil. While in his quest to find the answers, he learned that he is not like the others. He saw a monster not within him, but outside of him; he looks horrendously terrifying. Persistent to prove the goodness of man still exists, he planned to meet the father of the beautiful family he knew; a blind man. At first, he was successful because he was not judged by his physical appearance, but when the rest of the family came, he also endured the same torment he experienced just like of the villagers. The …show more content…
He did not experienced the special care of his creator and he was not given the chance to converse with him, gain knowledge, and protection. He also realized that he was alone and miserable, and that he knew that he cannot associate his deformed self with mankind, therefore he sought to have a companion. He demanded Victor to create a female companion for him. He demanded his request not to be refused, for it will make him eternally happy. He even swore that they will leave the places of man forever. After reflecting on the creature’s arguments, Victor agreed to his petition. However, through the course of his second creation, he procrastinated, neglected, and broke the promise he had given. His betrayal compelled the creature to draw more bitterness and revenge that resulted in more deaths amongst the Frankenstein family. His anger was diverted towards Victor’s loved ones in order for him to feel the anguish and misery he feels. Victor carried the burden and sorrow in his heart which eventually destroyed and led him to his miserable

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