The Contributions Of Slavery From 1830 And The Civil War

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Between 1830 and the Civil War, slavery was a major political and religious issue, many influential people spoke out against slavery. For instance, abolitionists such as Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Harriet Beecher Stowe, all wrote and spoke out against slavery in hopes of influencing others to abolish slavery. Frederick Douglass was born into slavery and wrote about his experiences. William Lloyd Garrison supported the immediate emancipation of slaves and started his own newspaper, the Liberator, to express his opinions. Writer, Harriet Beecher Stowe revealed the conditions of slavery to the world. Abolition was the idea of emancipation of slaves and ending racial differences in America. The abolition movement spread …show more content…
Douglass’s autobiography called the Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave was published in 1845. In his book, he describes his life, and his experience’s he had while he was a slave. After his book was published, he moved to Europe to avoid being returned to slavery. The supporters in Europe raised money and bought his freedom, Douglass then returned to America. Frederick also started his own newspaper, the North Star, to promote his beliefs on slavery and equality. He started his paper on December 3, 1847 in Rochester, New York. The newspaper became one of the most influential anti-slavery newspaper during abolition movement. There was over 4,000 readers within America, Europe, and the West Indies. The North Star lasted for four years before it merged with another newspaper and renamed “Frederick douglass’ paper”. He also was involved in the American Antislavery Society with William Lloyd Garrison. Frederick Douglass died on February 20, 1895 (Douglass page 9-58; Esty page 68-81; Frederick Douglass: America 's Hope for Equality Web; PBS …show more content…
She was born in Litchfield, Connecticut on June 14, 1811. Harriet was one of 13 children, all of her brothers became ministers and her sisters were involved in education reform and woman rights. The Beecher family was very religious and believed in social equality. Her father encouraged anti-slavery beliefs in the family. Harriet married Calvin Ellis Stowe on January 6, 1836 and moved to Brunswick, Maine. After the fugitive slave law was passed in 1850, Harriet wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The book is based off the life of a slave, Josiah Henson, and her own observations. Stowe’s best seller, Uncle Tom’s Cabin was published on March 20, 1852. In the first year over 300,000 copies of the book were sold. She wrote the book attempting to expose the horrible living conditions and treatment of slavery in the south. In the south the book was seen as a source of propaganda and threatened the slave system, in the North it was read as an inspiring novel. The book caused more sectional differences between the north and south. Harriet traveled to Washington D.C to meet President Lincoln after her book became popular. Presidents Lincoln’s comment to Harriet was, “so you are the little woman who wrote the book that started this Great War”. Harriet died on July 1, 1896 in Hartford, Connecticut (Harriet Beecher Stowe Web; History.com Staff “Harriet Beecher Stowe” Web; Uncle Tom’s Cabin

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