The Consequences Of The Binge Drinking Age

1492 Words 6 Pages
Everyone agrees that alcohol shouldn’t be given to young adults or children under a certain age. Alcohol is a very dangerous substance, but when used moderately, it can give people some benefits, especially for people aged 65 and older. Consuming one drink per day can lower the risk of heart diseases and diabetes as well as improve memory, but this may not benefit everyone who drinks moderately. On the other hand, if you drink a lot, alcohol can also damage every part of your body, such as your brain, heart, liver and pancreas. All around the world, alcohol has been a part of religious, professional, family and social life. In the United States, when people reach the age of 18, they are considered adults. They have the right to vote for …show more content…
If someone has immature parents, he/she is most likely to be less mature than someone else of the exact age who is raised by mature parents. It doesn’t matter if the MInimum Legal Drinking Age is 18 or 21, there will always be consequences. If adolescents are not educated properly about alcohol then binge drinking among 18 to 20 year olds could happen. Binge drinking is a problem in Europe among young adults, so without alcohol education, probably the binge drinking problem could also happen in the United States. If parents took the time to teach their children about drinking alcohol, most of the problems with lowering the drinking age would not happen. 29 states already allow underage drinking if there is someone older or their parents around them and they allow them to drink. People hear fewer stories in the news about a person drinking themselves to death at a bar than secretly in a college …show more content…
Alcohol is neither seen as a poison or something forbidden in those countries, there is no social pressure into drinking, irresponsible behaviors are not tolerated, and young people learn at home from their parents or from other responsible adults how to handle alcohol in a responsible way Just over thirty years ago, in response of public concerns about teen driving and drinking, Congress passed the National Minimum Drinking Age Act, which punished states who refused to make the legal drinking age from 18 to 21 by taking away their highway funding. Within a few years, all 50 states made the drinking age of 21, making the United States one of the four countries with a drinking age higher than 18 (other than Japan, South Korea and Iceland). But many experts doubt that this law decreased drink driving. Jeffrey Miron, a Harvard University economic professor had argued that the law had “little or no life-saving effect.” There are some evidence that show that raising the legal drinking age to 21 might have actually worsened the teen-binge drinking problem. According to a 2009 study published that between 1998 and 2005, among 18 year old to 24 year old, the number of cases of accidents related to alcohol increased,

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