The Consequences Of Prejudice In To Kill A Mockingbird

2617 Words 11 Pages
Prejudice is a contagion. It only takes one person to exhibit it, and then more will follow. This ignorant falsehood corrupts our minds into believing that it is acceptable to not to treat our neighbour as we would ourselves. As a result- society then becomes victim to its own prejudice. We see this in the short story ‘On the train’ by Fiona Kidman, ‘The Book Thief’ by Markus Zusak, ‘The Pianist’ which is directed by Roman Polanski and also in ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ written by Harper Lee. These texts highlight the fact that stereotyping is only for those without the perception to see people as they are instead of being like someone else they understand, but also that prejudice does not only harm an individual but also contributes to a larger …show more content…
Old traditions are carried out regularly by its inhabitants- a strong example being racial prejudice and class divisions. These ideas are explored through the eyes of a young girl, Scout, who’s childhood innocence and audacity naturally creates upset in the story whilst also heightening the malice in the behaviour we encounter throughout the novel. Tom Robinson, an African-American man falsely accused of raping a white woman, is a prime example in displaying the racial injustice present in Maycomb’s society. As readers we are painfully aware that the colour of his skin is all that keeps him susceptible to prejudicial treatment and ultimately the overruling of his trial. We see here that the bigoted attitudes of this racially divided district not only harm the individual but also lead to a much larger problem in social …show more content…
Kidman’s story is driven by her need to get us to evaluate our own social conscience and become aware of how unkindly we often treat those with disabilities. Zusak unfolds his applicable idea of duality; both the good and evil sides of humanity, especially through analysis of the German stereotype in WW2. Equally, Polanski positions us readers to reflect upon the real-life historic event (The Holocaust) and examine the cruelty and callousness in our human behaviour. Moreover, Harper Lee reinforces this theme by looking at the problem of racial prejudice present in 1930’s America. As readers, we are able to immerse ourselves fully into all four of these texts and sympathise and identify with their characters. After reading these powerful texts, we are left to contemplate the biblical reference ‘to love your neighbour as yourself’. Prejudice is a threat to society which can only be driven out by acceptance and tolerance towards others. We are all human and therefore we are all equal- we have no right to treat others without the respect and compassion that we would hope for in return. As Atticus Finch in To kill a mockingbird said, “you never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view- until you climb into his skin and walk around in

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