The Consequences Of Corporal Punishment In Psychology

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Statistics show that 94% of parents of toddlers use some form of corporal punishment and that 72% of a college student sample reported that they recalled experiencing some form of corporal punishment in their childhood (Athea C.A, Parkin C.M.). Corporal Punishment when referring to children is when physical force is used to correct or control a child’s behavior. The punishment is intended to cause discomfort and pain no matter how mild. Punishment in Psychology is defined as “any change that occurs after a behavior that reduces the likelihood that the behavior will occur again in the future.” In simple terms, punishment which can be both physical and emotional can suppress behavior. However there is a numerous amount of problems that come with …show more content…
The 2013 study titled “Spanking and Child Development Across the First Decade of Life” examined maternal and parental spanking of children at the age of 3 and 5. This was then used to find an association between spanking and an externalizing behavior and receptive vocabulary through the age of 9 (MacKenzie, 2013). The results were that a high-frequency of spanking issued by parents and especially by fathers at the age of 5 showed an association with lower vocabulary scores at the age of 9. The second study, conducted in 2010 titled “Love, discipline and elementary school achievement: The role of family emotional climate” found that using forms of physical discipline in kindergarten was associated with lower fifth grade math achievement. It also found that children who were spanked were at a higher risk of academic failure in the fifth grade (Bodovski and Min-Jong Youn, …show more content…
Children who are set to corporal punishment have been shown to be at a higher risk for mental health problems, ranging from anxiety and depression to alcohol and drug abuse. It has also been shown that parents who use corporal punishment regularly develop a distant child-parent relationship beginning around adolescence. A meta-analysis of 27 studies across countries and time periods from 2002 has found that regularly using corporal punishment on a child leads the child to become more aggressive in both adolescence and adulthood. (Reeves, Cuddy) This is because parents use the punishments to attempt to put an immediate stop or at the very least suppress behaviors such as reaching for a hot stove, shoving another child, running out into a street without looking, and so on. However, the child may learn to associate violence with having power or using violence to get their own way (Fasotti, L). This type of association if often linked with bullying and partner abuse as the child

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