Racial Discrimination In Detroit

Improved Essays
Detroit, once a symbol of progress in the American economy, has become the failure story of 20th century America. A main factor consisted in racial discrimination towards black people, bringing consequences such as racial division on the society and class inequality. However, racial discrimination did not exclusively brought capitalism towards Black Detroiters lives, but also oligarchy played a role.
In the 1940s, Detroit’s economy boomed, becoming the 4th largest industrial job market in the country, attracting not exclusively workers across the country, but the world (Sugrue 19). Unfortunately, this would last long, following the outbreak of World War II with the immigrant workforce on decline, and the influx of Black migration, residents
…show more content…
Initially, several companies hesitated to hire Black workers, with exceptions such as Ford, among the pioneers of Black employment source in Detroit. Hiring 12% of total workers, with the philosophy of Henry Ford’s paternalism and the capitalist approach, allocated Black workers into service and dangerous jobs. (Sugrue 25). Regardless of Ford’s effort to help the Black workforce, the panorama was not bright. Even both, supply and demand of jobs, were high enough to hire several workers, Black workers did not have the same ability to gain jobs as their White counterparts, focusing to gain employment as housekeepers and service workers.
Behind the reality of Black underemployment, recruiting process in manufacturing plants was an issue. Job inquiries from Black workers were always rejected, regardless of the availability of positions. Factory managers practiced an oligarchic recruitment, that allowed White workers to enjoy the benefit of working. However, this practice was common in selective plants, and did not reflect as a company in general. For example, every Big Three company, did have a fixed share of Black workers in selected plants and some that had barely or none. (Sugrue
…show more content…
This did not simply mean an investment, but the opportunity to make the American Dream a reality. However, real estate agents have not seen any potential to invest in the Black community. First measure was taken by giving the lowest rating in every Black neighborhood regardless of class. Even a middle-class Black was forced to settle in those neighborhoods without consent and desire. With poor maintenance, old and substandard complexes, no potential for improvements and increasing infringement of hazards, the panorama on every Black community seemed

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Capitalistic Abuse in Postwar Detroit The racial discrimination in postwar Detroit maintained and supported the capitalist economy inside the city in a variety of forms. The two biggest contributors to this notion began with the exploitation of African American workers in Detroit’s “meanest and dirtiest jobs” (Sugrue 2005, 91). This discrimination in the majority of Detroit's places of employment ultimately supported many employer's economic interests, and sizable profits. As African American’s were fired and taken advantage of in Detroit’s industries they were confined into inner city slums. This, secondly, is how the racial discrimination of Detroit's black community continued to support and maintain capitalism.…

    • 1132 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    However, due to the lack of opportunities for black males, many black women had to be the breadwinners of the house. Moynihan suggested the government to focus on issues like unemployment and poor black families,…

    • 1267 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The few professions that the black community was allowed included caterers, clerks, teachers, professional men, and small merchants. Furthermore, the Negros did not have chance to receive higher job positions because of the discrimination in Philadelphia. For example, as to getting work, even though a black person has been trained, he cannot receive a good position such as a mechanic. Rather he will only be hired for a position like small transient jobs. Black women faced worse discrimination as they were only permitted domestic service, sewing or married life, no matter how well they were educated.…

    • 1130 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There was still racial discrimination going on, even after the New Deal was passed in the 1930s. The New Deal had a portion which focused on the job ranking of African Americans. A person could not be turned away for a job due to their skin color .This fell apart in the 1950s (Goulbourne 194). White people have always seen black people as economically under them, so due the past economic situation, Hansberry shows that there still wasn’t a big advancement in the lives of most African Americans. African Americans faced an economic hardship, and this was clearly projected when Ruth refuses to give Travis 50 cents.…

    • 1215 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Alabama Coal Strikes

    • 1157 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Two of its worst qualities were its racism and sexism. While there were small groups of women and African Americans that were a part of the AFL, both groups were discriminated. The African Americans were barred from employment and union membership and for women, the AFL’s policies were equal treatment that of the African Americans. While they did seem to favor women unions, the AFL was still apathetic to the whole ordeal of females in unions. Because of AFL’s segregation, their concentrations of workers during the Industrial Era were skilled male workers of Caucasian descent.…

    • 1157 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Rules would be made against blacks and blacks seemed to always be separated from whites as if they had some kind of plague or were contagious. Rules made usually didn’t mean to make life easier on African Americans and sometimes weren’t even official rules. An author, Jarrold Packard, writes, “Blacks sitting in “their” section could be made to move if the white section became filled to capacity and more “white” seats were required. Needless to say, the opposite - approaching white seats to meet needs of an overfilled black section - never happened” (Packard 88). There was no compromise when it came to the needs of black people.…

    • 1497 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    20th Century Texas

    • 1408 Words
    • 6 Pages

    They moved to cities like African Americans, but found little success. They worked in Smelters, steel mills, lumber mills, anything that would pay. If jobs were hard to come by, they would just move to the next city to start…

    • 1408 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He say that “ north lawndale was an extreme portrait of the trend that ail black chicago” , and no white families lived there. He say that when the African American wanted to move to a better place, even though there would be houses for sale the white retailer wouldn't sale it to them. He claims that there were no laws that protected the African American peoples rights. He also says that blacks family's household is worth 20 time less than whites families household. He claims that black upper- middle-class families did not get to live in a better place than the poor black families, they were all basically trap in one big horrible places with little freedom.…

    • 904 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    More than ninety-percent of the white population probably thought that the black race was uneducated. Most of them would clean, cook, and serve in the homes of whites, but the whites did not care about them; they were just here to do a job. No one encouraged the black race to make something of them, to start a better life, to get an education, and escape the slavery. Blacks were just looked upon as lesser individuals in society that have different lifestyles, thoughts, and rights. During one part of his life, Richard is selected as valedictorian, but is given a speech by the principal to say at graduation.…

    • 1243 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Reconstruction (1865-1877) refers to the efforts made by the government to not only unify and rebuild relations between the North and the South but to also polish the depressing status of Black Americans. However the lack of political and social effort along with untreated economic wounds, halted Reconstruction, subsequently causing it to be unsuccessful for several reasons. The Freedmen’s Bureau was not only underfunded, but it was discontinued, leaving a massive number of Black Americans illiterate, land reform was not provided which then forced freed Blacks into the ingenious creation of sharecropping, the discriminatory Black Codes, though unconstitutional made racism legal and Reconstruction itself was terminated after only 12 years leaving…

    • 1388 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays