The Consequences Of Biological Theory In Criminology

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There is a lot of people in society who are fascinated with crime, the criminals associated with those crimes, as well as the punishments that courts hand down for those crimes. This interest in real life crime steams from all the press coverage of the crime as well as television shows and movies. Now criminology is the study of the extent, causes, nature, and preventions of a criminal behavior. When someone commits a crime, society is usually not involved with the process. However, they have a strong desire to watch and/or read about it. “However crime is not a clear-cut or static phenomenon” (Marsh & Melville, 2006, pg. 2). In earlier centuries, crime and the punishments for crime were viewed very differently than that of today. The punishments …show more content…
The main point of the theory is all of our behavior, feelings, and thoughts stem from our biology (Marsh & Melville, 2006). According to Crossman (2015), “Biological theories of deviance see crime and deviant behavior as a form of illness caused by pathological factors that are specific to certain types of individuals” (para.1). This particular method is causing changes in the judicial system as the judges will impose lesser sentences to the assailants who are proven to have genetically predisposition for violence. “Findings published in the journal of science, are likely to accelerate the use of brain science in legal proceedings” (Carey, …show more content…
According to Schmalleger (2012), “This includes the socio-psychological interaction by the offender with institutions and social organizations” (pg.177). According to this theory, people turn to crime due to peer pressure, bad school performance, and/or family problems. Youths who engage in violent behaviors are linked to childhood experiences of extreme behavioral problems. “This problem of order has been a critical issue in the development of sociological theorizing” (Marsh & Melville, 2006). The differential association theory provides that criminal behavior is most likely learned. Also the learning process influenced with contact from others with criminal tendencies. There is a never ending battle between order in society and differential association. If order was not maintained, then chaos would ensue and criminal activity would rise

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