The Negative Consequences Of Cyberbullying

1555 Words 7 Pages
Cyberbully, a movie made in 2011, became a big hit when it helped advocate cyberbullying to become illegal in 34 states. Cyberbullying is an act in which one is to bully someone repeatedly over electronics. This act is most commonly found among young teenagers. These electronics such as phones, laptops, ipods and even social media like Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat, give teenagers a perfect environment to use vulgar language and distasteful words without punishment. Teenagers are more likely to bully online rather than in person because there are no consequences and the possibility of deleting it is at each child's fingertips. This creates a bigger problem, because when a teenager tries to resolve a issue with the counselor and there is …show more content…
Although comments are placed behind a screen, the one whom it is directed to may misread the context. “One in five Idaho high school students have claimed to be cyberbullied, declaring Idaho to be reported as the No. #1 Cyberbullying state giving it a high 21.1 percent cyberbullying rate” (Webb) stated from Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRB). In 2015, a student of Rocky Mountain High School in Meridian, Idaho, has experienced it. Gifting Rocky Mountain the reputation of, the bullying school. High school is the source of all disasters when relating it to cyberbullying because every teenager has the ability to view such content and comment vulgarity without punishment or seeing the victims reaction. Although these students may not see the victims reaction while online, students will begin to see that the victims attendance shortens. “It started off as a simple rumor, but then worsened becoming more difficult, causing this student to skip class” (Webb). Cyberbullying is an effective way to lessen a child's attendance at school, interrupt education, and impact mental stability causing depression from solitude and no social interaction because of feeling alone. Not only do students post crude comments on Facebook or Instagram, students now have the ability to …show more content…
In 2012, “13% of teens who use social media (12-17) experienced a social network that made them feel nervous about going to school the next day. This is more common among younger teens (20%) than older teens (11%)” (Gilkerson). Young teenagers are found easier to manipulate or bully, skyrocketing the results between young and old because when the child gets older, the brain understands more and matures to the level of where if someone was to bully, it was not much of an issue unless it was a threat to be beaten up or killed. In addition, 1 in 6 parents know that his or hers child has been bullied over social media” (Gilkerson). If it was well known that a child has been cyberbullied, why doesn’t the mother or father address the issue to the other parent(s), it would give a better environment for the child to live in and prove that it should never hurt to stand up. Being bullied online has less of an effect than in person, yet can still hurt as much, but what should never hurt, is to stand up and speak up. What teenagers like to do, is orientate behind a screen, giving a upper hand to the situation which then is directed to school, spreading around and causing more online harassment by others now as well. “When teens see others being mean or cruel on social networks, frequently 55% see other people just ignoring what is going on, 27% see others defending the victim, 20% see others telling the offender to stop, and 19%

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