The Cons And Methods Of The Electoral College System

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By taking a glimpse at the United States history, the electoral college was formed to protect the interest of the minority and to avoiding the selection of a favourite candidate just by the majority population. This form was highly accepted and favoured as the other methods of selecting president as selection by the congress, majority rule and the selection by the state legislatures were rejected due to the high investment of power and protecting the minority rights. This modern system of electoral college was finally accepted after the rejection of First and Second Design during the 1800. After that year the president will be selected by the electors who will be each State depending on its population and the candidate who gain 270 electoral …show more content…
This system reduces the chances to the win the presidency for the third party or independent candidates are extremely low. As an example, “A third party or independent candidate were to win the support of even as many as 25% of the voters nationwide, he might still end up with no Electoral College votes at all unless he won a plurality of votes in at least one State” (The Pro 's and Con 's of the Electoral College System). This system limit the presidential election to a two party system which is considered as a good point of the electoral system. In fact if we look closely, this limits the people’s choice among the running candidates. The U.S, citizens are made to look at the candidates which only belongs to the two specific parties. So now back to the point which states that the electoral college will provide the firm stability. In current presidential election for Trump v/s Hillary, there are chance that both Hillary and Trump will not be able to get the majority vote and then the House Of Representatives will select the president of the United States. The U.S. had already faced that situation twice in past presidential elections of 1800 and 1824 as,” The 1800 election was one of three occasions when the electoral college failed to provide a winner. In 1824 …show more content…
The complex structure and lack of direct democracy cuse the voter turnout. For example, “ The candidate having the highest common vote in every state acquires the entire electoral votes within the states with clear favorites (republican or democrat), voters will usually feel that their votes take no affect” (Occupy Theory). This refers to the point of insignificance of individual votes when the election is ruled by majority. Due to which, if any person who is republican but, lives in California will less likely to go out and vote for the president because the entire State is democratic. In addition to it, the Electoral College over-represents rural populations, proponents respond that the United State Senate - with two seats per State regardless of its population - over-represents rural populations far more dramatically (The Pro 's and Con 's of the Electoral College System). The representation of the rural population discriminates the urban population to take part in the elections. This unequal representation violates the equal power distribution policy hence discourage the people from voting. As, “The New Millennium Report, issued by the National Association of Secretaries of State, also found that youth believe that government and elections are not relevant to things they care about. It has been suggested that this may be why many

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