The Concepts Of Strategic Family Therapy

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Strategic family therapy was developed with the contribution of Gregory Bateson, Jay Haley, Don Jackson, and many more. Strategic family therapy engages families and aims to alter their dynamic by engaging them in a creative behavioral task. Focus is put on present behaviors and presenting problems, rather than the past, thus insight is not the goal of this form of therapy. The concepts of strategic family therapy derived from concepts of communication, thus linked to one another. A double bind situation is when 1. Two or more people in a system have repeated exchanges of a negative command, which is then paired with a second, equally powerful, yet contrasting command, and 2. Both the commands are unavoidable due to a threat either in the …show more content…
The MRI model does this is two steps: 1. Defines the problem in a clear manner, and 2. Resolves the problem by setting attainable and measurable goals. Once the goal has been reached, then therapy can end. The Milan model aims for open communication in the system, thus utilizes game exposure, reframing and invariant exposure to strengthen the bond between the parents and split the parent-child bond that causes the family game to occur. The Washington School model aims to achieve change in behavior, which results in a change in feelings. Strategic family therapists encourage kindness, expression of love, joy, and self- care amongst individuals within the …show more content…
Joining the family, also known as, the social stage, is used to make the system feel comfortable and allows the therapist to take on a neutral stance during the therapy process and get to know the family. Reframing is another technique that aids to modify the systems perceptions or thoughts about their problems. Reframing could have a positive connotation attached to it to help bring out the intention of the problem, which can lead to the problem being solved. Strategic family therapists have three styles of communication, to 1. Ask a question or gather information 2. Paraphrase, reflect, or state a change in the systems process, and 3. Implement a directive. A directive is an assigned task to get the system to change their dysfunctional behaviors. A straightforward directive is an assignment given to the system to implement change and possibly even end the problem. While an indirect directive assignment, absurd tasks, restraining change, or advising the system to not change, is given to implement change by causing the system to experience some sort of frustration. In addition, paradoxical interventions are directives that change the systems positive feedback loop that impacts the problem or it challenges the systems behavioral patterns. Common paradoxical interventions include: prescribing the symptoms, restraining family change, and amplifying family difficulties. Furthermore,

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