The Concept Of The Soul Being Dual Natured In Han Solo And Han Solo

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In Platos allegory he discussed the concept of the soul being dual natured with his example of the chariot, charioteer and the two horses. In his example, one of the horses represents the bad side of the soul that desires earthly desires, in this case sexual activity. The other horse represents the good side of the soul that stays on the path towards the plain of the truth. The plain of truth according to Plato is where you can find real beauty, knowledge, truth, and justice. At the end of the day a soul should try to reach the plain of truth through its actions. This idea of the soul being dual natured can easily be seen in Han Solo. Han Solo soul is dual nature, as throughout the movie he battles between the good side of his soul and his …show more content…
When Luke is trying to convince Han Solo to join him and Obiwan on the journey to Alderaan to rescue the princess he states, "I'm not going anywhere." Then Luke responds sharing his worries, "They're going to execute her. Look, a few minutes ago, you said you didn't want to just wait here to be captures. Now all you want to do is stay?" Han then says, "Marching into the detention area is not what I had in mind". Therefore, when he is offered the reward, since saving the princess he would be great compensated he changes his minds and decides to go. We can compare this to the bad horse who desires earthly desires. This is Han Solo bad side of soul that is full lust, as all he wishes is earthy desires such as money. He is a character that only looks out for his best interest. His bad side is also seen towards the middle of the movie when he receives his reward after rescuing the princess and decides to leave and not help destroy the Death Star. However, he comes back at the end, willing to put himself in danger for the well-being of friends and justice. As Luke is trying to shoot the Death Star he is struggling since there's storm troopers shooting at his …show more content…
The charioteer in Platos Phaedrus represents the intellect, the power or reasoning. Plato when describing the plane of truth, he states, "It is perceived only by the intellect, the pilot of the soul, and is the object of the true kind of knowledge" (16). However, in Star Wars the force in this case the charioteer is not about the intellect or the reasoning. The first example is when Obi-Wan starts training Luke with his dad life saver. Luke struggles to hit the circular robot and Obiwan reminds Luke by saying "Remember, a Jedi can feel the Force flowing through him". Obiwan continues saying, "This time, let go your conscious self and act on instinct." Luke questions him and asks, "With the blast shield down, I can't even see. How am I supposed to fight?". Next Obiwan responds, "Your eyes can deceive you. Don't trust them. Stretch out with your feelings". Soon enough Luke follows Obiwans commands and successfully finishes his task by hitting the robot with his life saver. Here Obiwan challenges Plato's idea of the intellect as he tells Luke to close his eye and act on instincts. Another example that challenges Plato idea is after Obiwan dies and his soul guides Luke throughout the fight against the Death Star. Obiwan helps Luke by telling him, "use the force", "let go, Luke" "Trust me Luke". Luke then closes his eyes and

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