Silent Generation Marriage

Great Essays
The perception of marriage has changed drastically since the beginning of the 1900s to present day. A significant amount of this can be attributed to the experiences and events faced in each generation. As authors Neil Howe and William Strauss explore in their study, “The Next 20 Years: How Customer and Workforce Attitudes Will Evolve” insight into how each generation has influenced the other with its new developments of values and perceptions is provided, thus ultimately giving reason to why marriage is conceptualized the way it is today. The GI Generation arrived after the Great Awakening in the nineteenth century, where they faced hardships of war and depression, yet managed in midlife to “built up the postwar affluent society,” creating …show more content…
They became the risk-averse technicians organizing America’s “leading civil right activists, rock and rollers, antiwar leaders, feminists, public-interest lawyers and mentors” (Howe and Strauss 43). The Silent Generation was open to questions, reflecting and observation. Unlike the GI Generation, instead of placing a focus on duty, more emphasis was placed on art and theories, thus leading to a new awakening in the ideologies and beliefs to flood society’s perceptions. While the Silent Generation accepted the civic life and conventional culture of the GI’s, they began to reveal the strengths and weaknesses of the homogenic society. There was the understanding marriage was the “invisible handshake, and climbing the career ladder seemed to guarantee success,” it provided the best benefit for society’s community, but the Silent Generation began to base marriage off on a more personal, sensitive level (Howe and Strauss 43). Helping the community through marriage was still taken into consideration, but instead of going into a marriage with no emotional ties to the other, the Silent Generation looked to initiate more of a consensual bond. Marriage began to seem less as a contract and instead a sediment of love, similar to the conceptual framework …show more content…
287). This concept of attaching the notion of marriage to self, emotional bonding, responsibility and even love are a combination of all conceptual framings the past four generations have constructed. The Millennial Generation has taken components of each definition and adapted it represent a small portion of each. Similar to the GI’s, the Millennial Generation is considered to be the hero generation. While the Millennial’s did not gain this status by fighting in wars like the GI’s “their primary endowments relate to community affluence and technology” (Howe and Strauss 47). The Millennial generation was raised to be communal. They are the most likely to see others as equals. However, with that being said, the Millennial Generation much like the GI’s use marriage as a way to help benefit their community. The Millennial’s, while accepting of all races, ethnicities, sexualities and religions, when it comes to marrying out of their economic status it is not common. The GI’s married another to keep their class in survival. Without saying the Millennial’s reason of marriage

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