The Concept Of Life Expectancy In The Years Or GDP/Capita

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The first concept I chose is the overall trend in life expectancy between developed countries and less developed countries throughout time. The two variables I have chosen to illustrate this are life expectancy in years and income per person (or GDP/capita) because we tend to determine level of development of a country based on the income and GDP per person.
My observations reflect the concept because countries with higher income per person (such at The United States, Germany, or the UK) tend to have higher life expectancy rates than countries with lower income per person rates (such as Zambia, Afghanistan, or Nepal) over time. My observations also show that as the income per person in developed countries goes up the life expectancy rate goes
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Modernity brought science as a solution to problems. John Snows spot mapping helped developed germ theory and move away from Miasma theory thus showing the importance of public sanitation. The data also reflects what we have learned about the Mckeown Hypothesis, which states that public sanitation has done more to improve public health than medical advancements. As the Graph showed, all countries experienced an increase in life expectancy although at different rates. Well, in both developed and less developed countries, public sanitation and hygiene have improved over time despite how the income per person has changed therefore showing the effects of improved public sanitation. In conjunction with this, we see that the data reflects what we have learned about the Spanish Flu in connection with life expectancy. The interconnectedness of the world through travel and war at the time allowed for the Spanish flu–a result of the huge numbers of deaths, the poor sanitation and the infrastructure collapse in countries at the time¬–to spread around the world. Both developed countries and less developed countries were affected as the graph shows a global drop in life expectancy …show more content…
The two variables I have chose to illustrate this are child mortality (ages 0-5 dying per 1,000) and Income per person (or GDP/capita) because we tend to determine how developed a country is based on the income and GDP. My observations reflect concept because countries with higher income per person (such as The United States, Germany, or the UK) tend to have lower child mortality rates than less developed countries (such as Zambia, Afghanistan, or Nepal) over time. Also in both developed countries and less developed countries the general pattern shows that as income per person increases, child mortality decreases and when there are raises in child mortality it tends to be correlated with lowered income per person. The data shows that there is an overall trend down for child mortality. When income per person went down child mortality tended to increase slightly and this is more evident in less developed countries. Developed countries generally have much lower rates of child mortality than the less developed countries. The data also shows some uptick in child mortality for developed countries around the times wars and diseases, particularly the Spanish

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