Compare And Contrast Descartes And Dualism

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“I think therefore I am,” the popular quote of philosopher Descartes, is the main premise of his theory of Mind-body Dualism. Interactionism is the theory that there are two realities, mind and body, each of which can have an effect on the other. In contrast, dualists claim that the mind and body are two separate realities. The body is a material thing that operates in a physical reality, while the mind and mental states operate in a nonphysical reality. For the dualist, the way of thinking is an internal thinking on the inside that is private. I fully agree with Descartes’s concept of dualism. The mind is a lot more than chemical reactions going on in the brain. Thoughts, feelings, desire are all properties of the mind but not its parts. I …show more content…
The purpose of Descartes’ argument of doubt is to encourage us to doubt the truth in everything. Some would argue that the doubt argument is not valid because its conclusion does not follow its premises. While this is a strong observation, it overlooks the three arguments Descartes’ used to strengthen his premise on doubt - perceptual illusion, the dream problem, and a deceiving god. In the first case, perceptual illusion illustrates that things are not always just as they seem and since we cannot all be sure about what is true and what is not, it is our best interest to doubt any sensory knowledge. The dream problem claims that it is possible to doubt any physical thing actually exists and that there is an external world. Finally, the deceiving God argument states that we believe that there is an all-powerful God who created us and who is omnipotent. …show more content…
The conceivability argument is based on the premise that the mind is a thinking thing, while the body is not. The argument claims that (1) it’s conceivable for me to exist without having a body, (2) whatever is conceivable is possible, (3) thus, it is possible for me to exist and not have a body, (4) if it is possible for me to exist without having a body, then having a body is not essential to me. Plato believed that the mind was immortal and was what continued to live on after the death of the body. Descartes believed the same, even going as far as saying that the mind can continue as a disembodied existence. Some would object to Descartes’ argument stating that while it is valid, it may not be sound. The most questionable premise is the first premise. There, Descartes states that it would be conceivable for him for him to exist and not have a body. However, this response fails because of the ability to reincarnate. Reincarnation is a form of life after death that helps to overcome some of the obstacles monists, materialist who believes that all of reality is material, face and that of conceivability and the two concepts of the physical. Reincarnation bases its belief on the immortality of the soul because it proves the indivisibility of the mind is independent from the

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