The Computer Memory Interference Test (CMIT)

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Introduction Sleep is an important component for maintaining, sustaining, and optimizing academic performance. Different lifestyle needs fluctuate the amount of sleep between individuals and often led them to attain inadequate sleep. Sufficient sleep has been linked to the enhancement of emotional and social function, whereas insufficient sleep reduces cognitive function and negatively affects academic readiness (Deuster & Yarnell, 2016). Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles have collected data on performances based on sleep patterns on participants through a series of tests known as the Computer Memory Interference Test (CMIT). The CMIT was developed to record information and to analyze the effects of neurological and …show more content…
The students were required to perform a 15 minute computerized Memory Interference Test with either picture, words, or sounds that recorded/measured their cognitive function. Prior to taking their tests, students were asked to fill out a 40 question demographic questionnaire that would be incorporated into a larger database. Once the students had inputted their information into the database, they were given a set of instructions to follow throughout their choice of test. They were instructed to memorize pictures or sounds for each section of the test. Students were advised to press the left arrow key if the image displayed was not part of the section and the right arrow key if the image was part of the section. At the end of the CMIT, students were directed to use the number pad keys to categorize the various images displayed on the computer screen to their correct section of the …show more content…
The mean for the number of correct responses for students who slept three hours was 135.3, the standard deviation was 12, and the sample size was 180. As for the students who slept for eight hours had a mean of 136.3, a standard deviation of 10.9, and a sample size of 1487. The median for both groups was the same, 139 (Figure 1). The t-value for number of correct responses was 1.168 with an effect of 0.09. Looking at the student’s t-distribution table, we can infer that the p-value for figure 1 lies between 0.4 and 0.2 (Table 2). In figure 2, the average response time on the PMIT is demonstrated. The average response time on the PMIT for students who slept three hours was 0.83 seconds, the standard deviation was 0.12, and the sample size was 180. For students who slept for eight hours, the average response time was the same as the students who slept for three hours, 0.83 seconds. The standard deviation came out to be 0.11 from a sample size of 1487 individuals. Figure 2 had a t-test of 0.507 with an effect of 0.04. By looking at the student t-distribution table on table 2, we can conclude that the p-value lies above

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