The Jacksonian Class System

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During the Jacksonian Era, which lasted from about 1824 to 1840, the term “the common man” was used in reference to the social structures that were dominant in Britain at the time of American Independence. The term is used to characterize middle and lower class citizens. There is also the elite man, who are high class citizens. But in America, theoretically, any man can rise to an elite status. No man is bound to his class status, as class status is only reliant on the man 's ability and his work ethic. After the nation’s independence was confirmed following the end of the war of 1812, growth, social change, and expansion quickly flourished. Among the masses in the western states, there was a greater level of equality than of that in the previous …show more content…
America 's Revolutionary generation had vanished. With Adams and Jefferson, the remainders of the Federalists and Republican parties had also left. This assisted in the new found stability of political power, along with two new political parties. The 1828 election was evidence of the common people 's right to elect a President. Virginia Presidents and northern wealthy men no longer had superiority on making all of the decisions. Class systems were beginning to break down. Some states had even went the lengths to eliminate the requirement of property to be able to vote. The middle and poor class people completely supported Jackson, of course. They could relate to his class status and background, which brought them comfort and a sense of unity. This is something they drew strength from. One major event that really symbolizes the rise of the common man was the “war” against the second Bank of the United States. This bank was chartered in 1816 and lasted for about twenty years. This bank was primarily for federal funds. It paid national debts, but it was only accountable to stockholders and its directors, and it was not accountable for the common man, or for the voting …show more content…
The people supported Jackson and trusted him and his reasons for vetoing the Bank. Jackson did not end up losing votes like people thought may happen, and he was actually elected for a second term in 1832. The common man now was not looked down on, and when they all joined together and supported one another, they became just as powerful as any other class. Andrew Jackson is responsible for the start of this Jacksonian Democracy, which, simply put was a political philosophy. It started between the 1820s and 1830s, when Andrew Jackson and his followers, knows as the Jacksonians, claimed to stand for the common people of America. Jackson didn’t wholly believe in class status, as he grew up a common man. He knew these people didn’t have to be bound to the label of a societal status, and that they could work their way up just like he had if they wanted to. The Jacksonians declared themselves the guardians of the commoners against government preference of corporations and banks that only helped the wealthy. These ideas and practices forever changed politics in the United

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