The Color Purple Conflict Analysis

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The main conflict that Alice Walker addresses in this book is the idea that men believe they are superior to women in all aspects therefore causing abusive relationships such as domestic violence, but Walker also shows and explains various factors that often cause women to stay in such abusive relationships rather than leaving. The secondary source, “Breaking the Cycle of Intimate Partner Violence: Understanding Why Victims Don 't Leave and Implications for Advocates and the Criminal Justice System” by Crime Victims’ Institute claims that there are several factors that cause a victim to stay in the abusive relationship or that cause a victim to return to their abuser. In The Color Purple by Alice Walker Celie, the main character, was not a …show more content…
Celie’s mother had just given birth to a baby so she did not want any sexual relationships which angered Celie’s father. Celie was only a child when her own father started to rape her. Celie was very confused as to why her own father was doing that to her but all that would come out of his mouth was “you better shut up and git used to it” while Celie would be crying (Walker 1). Celie could not and did not tell anyone about her father raping her because he threatened her by saying “you better not tell nobody but God” or else he would kill her mother so she stayed quiet (Walker 1). The secondary source also shows that “victims frequently report fearing that the abuser will harm children, family members, and animals in retaliation for leaving the relationship” which explains why Celie did not tell anyone but God about the abuse (Goodson, Amanda. "Breaking the Cycle of Intimate Partner Violence: Understanding Why Victims Don 't Leave and Implications for Advocates and the Criminal Justice System." Research into Practice (2016): 1-4. Crime Victims ' Institute. Criminal Justice Center, Feb. 2016. …show more content…
Celie is very shocked as she had never had her own dress nonetheless one made just for her but the sisters remind her that she “deserves more than this” (Walker 21). The sisters try to defend Celie against all the harsh and mean stepchildren she has to deal with but one of the sisters ends up getting beat by Celie’s husband as well. The sister is shocked at how Celie is treated and more at how she lets herself and advices that she “got to fight them for yourself” but Celie believes that if she does what she is told she will do much better (Walker 21).The secondary source explains how “victims who feel helpless in stopping their own abuse are less likely to leave the batterer” which is exactly how Celie felt and therefore she just simply stayed where she was rather than fighting for herself (Goodson, Amanda. "Breaking the Cycle of Intimate Partner Violence: Understanding Why Victims Don 't Leave and Implications for Advocates and the Criminal Justice System." Research into Practice (2016): 1-4. Crime Victims '

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