The Collapse Of The Feudal System In Medieval Europe

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The collapse of the feudal system
A picturesques knight in shining armor chivalrously protects nobles and their land that has been given to them, which is being farmed by serfs . At its simplest the feudal system can be seen as the levels of hierarchy in Medieval Europe that revolved around land, labor, and protection. Starting in the 9th century, Feudalism created a prosperous society full of great cultural achievements. Although the feudal system’s decline is still controversial amongst historians, most believe that the Feudal system in Europe had completely dissolved by the the year 1500 CE The collapse of the feudal system was caused by the changes European society due to structural changes in infrastructure, the black plague, the conflicts
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To start the Feudal system collapsed due to structural changes in society such as the changing political structure. An example of how the structure of society changed can be shown through the changes occurred in the government. Up until the 1200s England had been ruled strictly as a monarchy, with all of the power in one man; the king. In 1215 many nobles feared the current king, King John XII had too much power and control. So much power could overtime result in only one thing corruption. At birth as the youngest son, there was no logical path way for him to become king. Due to circumstances, when he did become King, John earns the title from many historians as the worst king in history. He imposed high taxes, in order to support one unsuccessful military campaign after the other. In response the barbons pressured the current king, John XII, into signing one of the most significant document in Medieval Ages; the Magna Carta. Although this document posed ideas that were extremely time specific, such as the King having to ask permission from his nobles before raising …show more content…
All of these changes not only affected society as a whole, it affected every layer of the Feudal system. With the changing role that religion as well as government played in society the daily live of many people were altered. At a larger scale the spread and death that was cause by the black death resulted in more opportunity for peasant. Finally the new ideas that came to Europe through conflicts such as the Crusades exposed Europeans to more ideas and technology. The Feudal system had been created after the fall of rome and lasted until Renaissance was birthed in italy. The term Feudalism itself is not a word that originated from the middle Ages. Like many other phases that are synonymous with this time period, it was coined much later. In fact the word was not used until over 300 years after the system in Europe had collapsed. Similar to the Renaissance 's term for the middle ages, the dark Ages, the term Feudal originally was defined as “absurdly outdated or old fashioned” This shows the views that future centuries had about the past system. While history often writes the middle ages to be barbarick, the feudal system itself, was far more sophisticated than one might

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