The Clash Of Humanity In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

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Being human is given, but preserving humanity is a choice. In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley reveals his fears of the imminent time where humans may fail to exhibit humanity when confronted with a world composed of irrelevance, triviality, and ignorance, forcing all to accept a life where the meaningful truth is justified and valued as if it were meaningless and false. Throughout the plot, Huxley makes it obvious that John shares more commonalities with the reader than the other characters in this novel, seemingly placing the reader into his shoes. The reader soon learns that John continuously struggles to prove not only his worthiness as a human being to the utopian future but our legacy of humanity as well. By embracing all of life’s imperfections, …show more content…
The reader is able to grasp John’s obvious resentment of committing to Brave New World’s manipulated society when he rejects the process of adapting to the societal norm. Through his defiant actions of not conforming to society, John alienates himself in hopes to find who he truly is. For instance, instead of taking advantage of the fabricated happiness at hand, known as soma, John believes that through pain, suffering, and discomfort, he will find the destination of true happiness, allowing himself to accept his own flaws and fundamentally lead him to self acceptance. Huxley specifically articulated the character and actions of John to mimic the thoughts and actions of generations of readers today, revealing that within ourselves we still struggle to this day embrace our own imperfections because we choose to look through the distorted, synthetic looking glass of society instead of looking through our own real eyes as human …show more content…
For example, John had no one to relate to being an outcast in both the Savage Reservation and the Brave New World. He was not dictated a place in society like everyone else, who seemed to have an explicit purpose in life, so in a way he was treated as a misplaced object as opposed to a lost soul, which resulted in a life of disapproval and misunderstanding of himself and of the society as a whole. As a part of human nature, without receiving the acceptance of others, one cannot truly accept himself or his flaws, though in the eyes of Huxley, posing John as an outcast held significance within the underlying plot scheme. With the simple intentions of John foiling each character physically, mentally, emotionally, and at times verbally, Huxleys demonstrates the evolution of the selfish side of the human condition, which is achieved by stripping people of their personal emotions, consciousness, and independence in order to enslave the bodies, deceive the minds, and dictate life for personable gain. In other words, Huxley is cautioning the readers the potential society has to morph the pure thought of a human into a mindless, mechanical, breathing

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