What Are The Goals Of The Civil Rights Movement

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The mid - 20th century was a very tumultuous and groundbreaking time period in American history and it 's after effects still reverberate in American society today. Citizenship is the status of being legally recognized in a state or country, being recognized socially and politically, as a human member. This has been a privilege in America solely belonging to white people and also the final goal of the civil-rights movement of 20th century. The civil-rights movement tracks the struggle for black equality and recognition in America, even just the need for the civil-rights movement is testament to the plights faced by black people in America. Black people did not have access to the basic civil rights that should be enjoyed by every citizen in …show more content…
E. B. Du Bois, the editor of its monthly journal, who used it to publicize the plights of black people and organization efforts, spearheaded the NAACP. The NAACP preached racial unity and sought complete integration in American society. In a moment of civil disobedience, Rosa Parks, a black woman, refused to give up her seat on the bus to a standing white man. Parks was eventually arrested and ejected from the bus but also, unknowingly set forth waves in Montgomery, Alabama 's black community. E. D. Nixon, President of the Alabama NAACP, decided to use the arrest of Parks as would serve as rallying point for the black community. Nixon organized a boycott of the city 's bus systems that was facilitated by carpools by members of the community at bus-fare cost. The black community was hopeful for social change and united. They feared without a figurehead to rally behind and an organized leader this unity would crumble; Martin Luther King was nominated as this leader. Martin Luther King, inspired by Gandhi and Thoreau, preached against violence but for persuasion and the transforming power of love and led this movement on peaceful protests that attacked the morality of white supremacy and were made to generate an emotional appeal to white people. They were able to build up some white ally-ship of whites that sympathized with the black struggle and wanted to aide the movement. The NAACP won two battles at the Supreme Court regarding the "grandfather clauses" and city ordinances mandating residential segregation. The NAACP was not the sole point where the black movement was focused through but one of the many facets of the same movement for black equality. Another facet, and a rather contrasting one, would be that of Nation of Islam and Malcolm X; they did not seek "integration" but

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