The Civil Rights Act Of 1968 And The Voting Rights Act Of 1964

2166 Words 9 Pages
The passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, along with the accompanying Voting Rights Act of 1965, which prohibited discrimination in voting, and public facilities such as hotels and restaurants. Alongside their partnering creation of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to enforce the ban on discrimination by sex, religion, and race in hiring, promoting, and firing in the workplace are the most significant events that have shaped America into the nation, it is today. Reasons, why they are such momentous pieces of legislation, are that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 officially outlawed the then common practice of segregating public accommodations such as public schools, libraries, beaches, movie theaters, theme parks, and even restaurants …show more content…
Moreover, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 officially guaranteed African-American citizens their Fifteenth Amendment right to suffrage, which had been denied to African-American men from the 1870’s and 1880 's on, according to the Constitutional Rights Foundations website, and African-American women since the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920. African-Americans were denied enfranchisement through poll taxes, literacy tests, and racial intimidation by the Ku Klux Klan. Additionally, these two Acts led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, (also known as the Fair Housing Act of 1968), which prohibits discrimination in the housing market based on racial identity. This essay will cover how and why the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, are two of the most significant pieces of legislation, and how the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is still relevant to the present day, fifty-two years after being signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson. How the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is still applicable in 2016 and beyond is through the end of segregated public facilities in The United States and the enforcement of the ban on discrimination in the workplace based on gender, race, and …show more content…
3330), The Voting Rights Act of 1965 became necessary after it came to light that African-American citizens in the South were still deprived of their Fifteenth Amendment right to vote. They were denied this right through the use of state laws requiring prospective voters to read and interpret sections of the state constitution to register to vote. In Alabama, voters had to provide written answers to a 20-page test on the Constitution and state and local government. Questions included: Where do presidential electors cast ballots for president? And Name the rights a person has after a grand jury has indicted them? Understandably, this would prove to prevent most African-American citizens from even registering to vote, nonetheless actually vote in an election, since one would undoubtedly need a doctorate in law to be able of passing the 20-page test effectively. Due to this undue burden on potential African-American voters, in Early 1965, Martin Luther King, Jr. launched a voter registration drive through Selma, Alabama to bring the issue of voting rights to national attention. The voter registration drive lasted for seven weeks and led to the subsequent arrest of 2,000 black demonstrators including Martin Luther King, Jr. himself. Protesters received charges of contempt of court, juvenile delinquency, and parading without a permit. After their release from jail, the demonstrators planned another march on March 7th, 1965 from

Related Documents