Principles Of Restorative Justice

Superior Essays
(1) Using at least 250 words, explain each of the guiding principles of restorative justice.

Restorative justice is a process in which the offender repairs wrongdoings that were done to the victim and to the community. Instead of a traditional trial, the offenders are encouraged to take responsibility for their actions by expressing remorse and even apologizing to the victim. The restorative justice process gives the victim the opportunity to meet with the offender so the victim can explain the impact of the crime to the offender, while also giving the victim the opportunity to forgive the offender. The offender is on a path to be reintegrated into the community without any further shame to them while gaining respect.

The restorative justice program is a program that requires cooperation from the government and the community. Once the offender has shown remorse and apologized, they shouldn’t be still classified as the criminal that they once were. Instead, this should be seen as their second chance at a better future.
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The offender is given the opportunity to leave the jail as long as they have a place to live and a job waiting for them. It is believed that if you treat the criminal with respect and fairness, they are less likely to foster defiance and continue their criminal path. Restorative justice also reduces the offender’s criminal involvement (Lilly, Ball, & Cullen 2015).

Restorative justice is not going to be as effective if they offender is court ordered to do so. It has also been found that it is “more effective with low-risk offenders” (Lilly, Ball & Cullen, 2015).

(3) Akers postulated four central concepts. Using at least 250 words, describe and explain those

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