The Characteristics Of Howard Gardner's Theory Of Intelligence

950 Words 4 Pages
The term ‘intelligence’ is broadly defined by many as the mental capacity to acquire and apply knowledge and skills. The word itself has a positive connotation and is used to describe someone with a high intellectual abilities or brainpower. However, there is no standard definition of what constitutes intellectual capacity or brainpower. To find a satisfying answer as to what intelligence is, many psychologists have studied it and came up with different theories that define intelligence. The concept of intelligence is different from culture to culture. In some parts of the world, being intelligent may be knowing how to assemble something, while in other parts of the world it could be having superior cognitive performance. Regardless of the …show more content…
Unlike previous theories, the focus of Gardner’s theory was not on tests that can numerically measure a person’s intelligence. He theorized that “a grouping of seven intelligences more accurately accounts for the diversity of ways in which people acquire and utilize knowledge” (Sparked 1). Gardner was able to come with those seven intelligences by using biological as well as cultural research. His seven intelligences are: Logical-Mathematical Intelligence, Linguistic Intelligence, Spatial Intelligence in which a person is able to manipulate and create mental images in order to solve problems, Musical Intelligence, Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence or the ability to use one’s mind to control one’s bodily movements, Interpersonal Intelligence or the ability to apprehend the feelings and intentions of others, and finally intrapersonal Intelligence or the ability to understand one 's own feelings and motivations. (Sparked). Gardner argues that people don’t possess a single intelligence, instead they have multiple intelligences that are based on different skills and abilities. Gardner’s theory is the most favored one because it caters to everyone in society, not just those who score high on …show more content…
Peter Salovey and John Mayer regard emotional intelligence as “the ability to perceive, understand, manage, and use emotions” (Myers 436). Those who are emotionally intelligent are self-aware and are able to control their emotions. To give further insight into emotional intelligence, Mayer, Salovey, and David Caruso designed tests that yielded important results. They found out that people who scored higher on emotional intelligence tests were overall much happier those who did not. “In both the United states and Germany, those scoring high on managing emotions enjoy higher-quality interactions with friends of both sexes” (Myers 437). They are able to lead productive lives, avoid falling into depression, and often give good

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