Women's Jobs In The 1920s

Decent Essays
In America, women have the same rights of any other man, but it hasn 't always been like that. Before the woman 's rights movement, many women didn 't have a voice in America 's past male dominated society. In fact, the mere thought of a woman participating in anything besides, cleaning their husbands houses, raising their children, or making dinner was absurd. Throughout America, women were viewed as fragile and dimwitted, and nothing a woman said was taken seriously. However, when too many men left to fight in World War Two, more women were pressured into working “male” jobs. These male jobs were usually labor-forced industry jobs. Many women were convinced that working these jobs was a patriotic act from wartime propaganda, so many women …show more content…
This was the the first time a portion of women joined the workforce. It also sparked women 's self-interest and raised expectations toward themselves. However, it was not something that was socially accepted. In The New Woman: Changing Views of Women in the 1920s, Estelle B. Freedman states, the “growth of a female labor force did not automatically change attitudes toward working women” (380). In fact, after WWI ended and men came home, the majority of women who were sought out to enter the workforce, went back home and ceased working. Besides the social discrimination, women were also discouraged from working by being significantly paid less. There was “an exploitative double standard of wages geared to nonpermanent help” (Freedman, 380). Incidentally, in World War Two (WWII) history seemed to repeat itself. Women were needed to yet again going to workforce due to lack of males. Persuaded by wartime propaganda and patriotism, women joined the workforce again. The government went out of their way to persuade women into the workforce. They created multiple campaigns to boost women in the workplace such as “Rosie the Riveter,” which is now a famous icon and feminists symbol. According to the Metropolitan State University of Denver, “the percentage of married women working outside the home increased from 13.9 to 22.5.” and about half of them worked in defense …show more content…
House of Representatives (2007), the Woman’s Rights Movement began in 1848, with the first gathering devoted to women 's rights on July 19th and 20th in Seneca Falls, New York. They go on to say, “About 100 people attended the convention; two-thirds were women,” and the declaration that all men and women were created equal was discussed. However, much of the 1850s denied basic economic freedoms to women. Which led the unsuccessfully lobbying of Congress to include women in the 14th and 15th amendments, as stated by the History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives. Women didn’t have any rights and were second class citizens. In 1869, two forms of the suffrage movement developed. One of which focused on changing federal law and opposing the 15th Amendment as it excluded women, called the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA). The other, the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA), “rejected the NWSA’s agenda as being racially divisive and organized with the aim to continue a national reform effort at the state level.” according to, the History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives. During the 1880s, both divisions of the woman’s rights movement struggled to manage any power. Nonetheless, in the early 18990s, the women 's rights movement experienced a turning point. With its newfound “surge of volunteerism among middle-class women—activists in progressive causes, members of women’s clubs and professional

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    This thought that women should be at home continued until the war in 1940. While most women in the decade were starting to protest sexist companies for not hiring women it wasn't this area where it made the biggest of changes, hence how the Great Depression suspended the progress for women in for women in the work…

    • 1301 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These women were usually in the lower class or the minority and many men did not have the best attitude toward them. American women played important roles during World War II, both at home and in uniform. Not only did they give their sons, husbands, fathers, and brothers to the war effort, they gave their time, energy, and some even gave their lives. Numbers of women working outside the home rose exponentially and they thought they were there to stay. The gap in the labor force created by departing soldiers meant opportunities for women.…

    • 1635 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    During the 20s most women remained in traditional roles of housewives and mothers. Not all women wanted or welcomed change and women in the workforce still experienced a lot of discrimination in roles and wages. During the war, many women filled the roles of the men in their jobs however once the war was over men returned to their jobs and women were forced to roles that were coined as female roles such as teachers, nurses, secretaries and librarians. https://www.americanhistoryusa.com/working-voting-women-1920s/ Also, society regarded the cultural changes women were making was creating a negative response from society, resulting in women being strongly judged. In conclusion, women achieved a lot of change during the roaring 20s.…

    • 547 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    European women's rights were impacted a lot by World War I. During the war women had to take over many positions men were no longer available to fill, as many men were of fighting in the war. This showed politicians that women can handle more responsibility and they could be seen as more equal to men. Women working eventually lead to them gaining more rights. World War I had a major impact on women's rights and daily lives due to the fact the women began to work to support themselves and their families, which some men and women did not agree with due to standing gender roles during this time period.…

    • 611 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Georgina Smith Ms. Large Social Studies 11 5th April 2016 Women’s Role in the First World War Many men during WWI, shunned the idea of women playing a frontline role in ‘their war’, and rarely even accepted their help. Some men even went as far as to consider the recruitment of women, a sign of total war. This was because in all of the past years, women’s only role was to stay home and support the family.The first world war gave women the chance to dramatically change their role in everyday life. However, they certainly had to work towards it. A lot of women on the homefront were anxious, alone, and in constant fear that they would get a letter about their husband’s or son’s death.…

    • 1022 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    At the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, women had no rights to file for divorce, own property, vote or get the same education as men. However, the nineteenth century brought changes to women issues, more women were starting to recognized the imbalanced of power between the sexes and saw winning the right to vote would bring them closer to equality. During the starting stages of the women’s suffrage movement, elite and middle class women were the driving force in the movement. However, as the movement continued more working class women started to support the campaign. The women’s suffrage movement first started attracting major attention from Parliament when the philosopher John Stuart Mill proposed a new amendment calling for the inclusion of women’s right to vote in 1866.…

    • 723 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Although there were some gains in the status of women brought about by the war, the return of men from the homefront often pushed women out of their jobs. Most of those who were allowed to keep their jobs were not receiving equal pay and did not have access to the skilled labour force. The mood after the war was very much a feeling that all of the gains women had made were quickly lost. Women had gone from having larger amounts of freedom and equality, and many felt this was taken away from them at the end of the war. Suffrage, all though not given fully until 1928, was considered by some to be an attempt to make up for the fact that women’s equality in British society was seemingly slipping…

    • 1934 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Added to that myth was that once the war was over, the women eagerly left the workforce to start families. Post war many women were fired or were unenthusiastic about leaving the workfront. In reality,most of the women who took jobs that had previously qualified as men’s work had already been working for years prior to the war. These jobs were “women’s work” such as typists or paid homemakers. Many of the Rosies, in fact, were not middle class or white.…

    • 1104 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One example of this can be seen in women’s rights in the work force. Over time, women have been known to have their jobs taken from them by men in the business world. Throughout history, men have always had the better jobs, with women playing the role as clerk typists, secretaries, and administrative assistants. (Infoplease,2000) Employers had believed women weren’t fit to perform tasks that men could do because they believed women lacked the skills and knowledge based solely upon gender. Even when women did get hired, their employers did not give them the higher level, more experienced jobs such as various management positions.…

    • 2047 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “In the last thirty years women’s participation in the workforce, in athletics, and in professional education has increased in the US. But gender stereotypes are just as strong today as they were three decades ago in the country, according to a new study.” (Beall). While women are reaching more equality, it is shown that they are not in the right mindset. There are resources to help modern day women investors, such as Women & Co., an organization by Citigroup that gives women access to information about women managing money, careers, and family life. One thing this study did show is that now both genders are responsible for family and individual finances, while thirty years ago this was not so much true.…

    • 3452 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Decent Essays