The Changing Medieval Society In The Knight's Tale By Geoffrey Chaucer

Decent Essays
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer is the documentation of 29 different people going on a pilgrimage. It shows the changing medieval society-taking place in England and the people coming on this journey come from all different types of shire’s and social classes. They are travelling from London to Canterbury for a spiritual journey that will bring people closer to the divine spirit and help them evolve into better people. Harry Bailey who is hosting tells the guest’s that in order to make the ride more fun and make time pass, that each pilgrim tell two tales on the way to Canterbury and two tales on the way home from Canterbury. One story Chaucer brings to the reader 's attention is that of The Knight 's Tale. He is the first person …show more content…
He is a very distinguished knight who was honored by many for his valor and he had the highest honor a Knight could receive with a high amount of respect for people with loyalty, honor, generosity and chivalry. He fought in the King 's service and fought for the King of Palathia, and in all his battles he came out victorious. Despite his high honor being known and all of his victories he was one of the more modest and humble characters introduced to us. Everyone accompanied by the Knight spoke in a proper tongue showing elegance in his or her speech. This shows the difference between The Knight and The Miller 's Tale. In the Miller 's Tale John and Nicholas both have very rude and immature language in the way they speak to people. It is shown Chaucer prefers the more noble, classy man over what the Miller’s tale portrays which is why it’s very fitting that the narrator introduced him as the first character since he depicts what a true noble man should be during the medieval times. The Knight’s tale illustrates a perfect example of a hierarchical and patriarchal society, which also shows the how many people can change their lives and fate by their …show more content…
The parson is a priest of the parish and a man who solely follows God 's work. He describes how your entire life is a pilgrimage and how God does not desire any man to fail. He states how God is a loving and merciful man and does not want damnation to any living man. The first part of his sermon describes that penitence is broken down into three parts, contrition, confession and satisfaction. The second part of his lecture describes the belief of confession and how it is the most important step, since you are revealing your sins to a priest. This is important since sin is the product of a struggle between the body and the soul. The third and final part breaks down all the 7 deadly sins and how pride is the worst of all sins. When you have too much pride, ire, envy, sloth, avarice, gluttony and lechery are the products. In the Knight 's tale, both Palamon and Arcite become very prideful over Emily and want her as their prize. This shows how both men have a avarice over Emily and only want her for themselves. This leads both men to become envious and angry (irv) over each other and the other person 's victories. As described in the Parson 's tale this is a sin and therefore they are not truly worthy of Emily 's love. None of these men felt the need to confess the sins they were doing because in their eyes they weren 't doing anything wrong and they

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